Coronavirus Update


For Federal Government Updates on COVID-19 check this website:  https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/canadas-reponse.html?topic=tileline

As of today, July 9, Nova Scotia has four active cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified on Wednesday, July 8.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 398 Nova Scotia tests on July 8 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 56,227 negative test results, 1,066 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and four active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-nine cases are now resolved. One person is currently in hospital. Their COVID-19 infection is considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Atlantic Canada must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance when and where required, and wearing a non-medical mask is strongly recommended when physical distancing is difficult.

As of July 3, interprovincial travel within Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador, without the requirement to self-isolate for permanent Atlantic Canadian residents, is permitted. All public health directives of each province must be followed. Under Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act order, visitors from other Canadian provinces and territories must self-isolate for 14 days. Other visitors from outside the Atlantic provinces who have self-isolated for 14 days in another Atlantic province may travel to Nova Scotia without self-isolating again.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia .

As of today, July 8, Nova Scotia has five active cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified on Tuesday, July 7.

The new case is a Nova Scotia truck driver who travelled outside Canada as an essential worker.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 475 Nova Scotia tests on July 7 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 55,818 negative test results, 1,066 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and five active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. One person is currently in hospital. Their COVID-19 infection is considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Atlantic Canada must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance when and where required, and wearing a non-medical mask is strongly recommended when physical distancing is difficult.

As of July 3, interprovincial travel within Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador, without the requirement to self-isolate for permanent Atlantic Canadian residents, is permitted. All public health directives of each province must be followed. Under Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act order, visitors from other Canadian provinces and territories must self-isolate for 14 days. Other visitors from outside the Atlantic provinces who have self-isolated for 14 days in another Atlantic province may travel to Nova Scotia without self-isolating again.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia .


 As of today, July 7, Nova Scotia has four active cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified on Monday, July 6.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 291 Nova Scotia tests on July 6 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. As of Monday, July 6, the COVID-19 outbreak at Northwood’s Halifax campus is considered resolved after completing 28 days with no active cases.

To date, Nova Scotia has 55,428 negative test results, 1,065 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and four active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital. Both patients’ COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Atlantic Canada must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance when and where required, and wearing a non-medical mask is strongly recommended when physical distancing is difficult.

As of July 3, interprovincial travel within Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador, without the requirement to self-isolate for permanent Atlantic Canadian residents, is permitted. All public health directives of each province must be followed. Under Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act order, visitors from other Canadian provinces and territories must self-isolate for 14 days. Other visitors from outside the Atlantic provinces who have self-isolated for 14 days in another Atlantic province may travel to Nova Scotia without self-isolating again.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .


One New Case of COVID-19

 Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, will provide an update today, July 6, at 3 p.m.

This update will be livestreamed on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast .

As of today, July 6, Nova Scotia has four active cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified on Sunday, July 5.

 The new case is related to travel outside Canada. The individual does not reside in Nova Scotia but was passing through from the United States to Prince Edward Island. As they are still within the 14-day isolation period required by the federal Quarantine Act, they are now being quarantined under federal authority in Nova Scotia.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 178 Nova Scotia tests on July 5 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 55,113 negative test results, 1,065 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and four active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital. Both patients' COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

Official Government Release COVID19/BUSINESS--Application Deadline Extension for Small Business Reopening and Support Grant

The application deadline for the Small Business Reopening and Support Grant has been extended to Friday, July 17, to allow more time for businesses to apply.

The $25 million program provides grants of up to $5,000 to help eligible small businesses, non-profits, charities ,and social enterprises to resume operations. It also includes a business continuity voucher of up to $1,500 that can be used for advice and support to help them become more resilient in the coming months.

"As further restrictions are lifted, more and more small businesses are reopening and adapting to the new reality," said Geoff MacLellan, Minister of Business. "For many, the costs associated with reopening safely are an added pressure during an already stressful time. This is why we are extending the application deadline for businesses to apply for the Reopening and Support Grant."

 

The program is open to businesses that were ordered to close or greatly reduce their operations by the Public Health Order, or who were significantly impacted by social distancing and orders to stay home.

 

Eligible businesses must have been established before March 15, 2020 and experienced a year-over-year revenue decline of at least 30 per cent from either April 2019 to April 2020 or May 2019 to May 2020.

 

Quick Facts:

-- applications for the Small Business Reopening and Support Grant opened on June 8

-- the amount of the grant is calculated as 15 per cent of sales revenues for either the month of April 2019, May 2019 or February 2020 (applicant chooses the month) up to a maximum of $5,000

-- businesses do not currently need to be open to apply. Applications will be accepted if they have plans to reopen

 

Additional Resources:

 

More information on the Small Business Reopening and Support Grant is available at:  https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/small-business-reopening-support-grant/

 

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them reopen safely at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia

 

A list of supports announced for businesses is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/support/#support-for-business


 

Bubble up, Atlantic Canada – and bring your identification with you.

Starting Friday, July 3, if people live in another Atlantic Canadian province and want to visit Nova Scotia, they will need to show proof of residency to enter the province.

Every adult will need to show either a drivers’ licence, government identification card, health card, or a utility bill or bank statement with a valid Atlantic Canadian address to provincial officials at airports, ferries or the land border when they arrive in the province. No self-declaration form will be required.

If people can prove with these documents that their permanent home is in Atlantic Canada, they will not have to self-isolate for 14 days when coming into Nova Scotia.

“Businesses and communities are looking forward to welcoming Atlantic Canadian visitors,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “We’ve worked hard to get to the point where we can welcome our neighbours safely and it’s important for everyone to respect the public health guidelines.”

It is important to remember that Nova Scotia’s borders are restricted, not closed. People from outside Atlantic Canada are welcome in the province. They must self-isolate for 14 days when they arrive. If they have already self-isolated in another Atlantic Canadian province, they may enter Nova Scotia without self-isolating again.

“I know many people are still nervous about this virus. Our visitors may be, too,” said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health. “We can make their visits a safe experience for everyone by being patient and kind, by practising good hand hygiene, distancing and by wearing a mask when you can’t stay six feet apart.”

Nova Scotians who are planning to visit another Atlantic province should check before they leave to ensure they have the information documentation required in that province.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to July 12

 

As of today, July 2, Nova Scotia has 1,064 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Wednesday, July 1.

The new case is an individual who is in Nova Scotia as a temporary foreign worker. They have been self-isolating since arriving in the province, as required. The likely source of infection for this case, as well as the two previously announced this week, is from travel outside of Canada.

“These new cases highlight the importance of our public health directives, particularly the 14-day self-isolation period upon arrival in Nova Scotia,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “These directives are in place to protect us and I ask all Nova Scotians to continue to take care and respect the rules.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 284 Nova Scotia tests on July 1 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 53,994 negative test results, 1,064 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and three active COVID-19 case. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital. Both patients’ COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance when and where required, and wear a non-medical mask when physical distancing is difficult.

Beginning Friday, July 3, interprovincial travel within Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador, without the requirement to self-isolate for Atlantic Canadian residents, will be permitted. All public health directives of each province must be followed. Under Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act order, visitors from other Canadian provinces and territories must self-isolate for 14 days. Other visitors from outside the Atlantic provinces who have self-isolated for 14 days in another Atlantic province may travel to Nova Scotia without self-isolating again.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

One New Case of COVID-19

As of today, June 30, Nova Scotia has 1,062 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Monday, June 29.

The new case is related to travel and the individual had been self-isolating since returning to the province, as required.

"While we've made great progress in reducing the transmission of COVID-19, the reality is Nova Scotia will see more cases," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "I ask everyone to continue doing everything they can to keep COVID-19 at bay by respecting the rules and following public health advice."

 

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 203 Nova Scotia tests on June 29 and is operating 24-hours.

 "Today's case shows that we cannot be complacent about this virus. Living with COVID-19 is part of our new normal and no one should let their guard down," said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health for Nova Scotia. "It remains vitally important for people to practise physical distancing wherever possible and wear a mask when this is difficult, follow all public health directives on how people can gather, staying home if unwell and practise good hand washing and cleaning."

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 53,544 negative test results, 1,062 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and one active COVID-19 case. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital. Both patients' COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.


Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health for Nova Scotia, announced today, June 26, further lifting of restrictions given Nova Scotia’s continued low rates of COVID-19.

“We’ve now had more than two weeks with no new cases of COVID-19, and Nova Scotians are getting back to normal activities while maintaining precautions,” said Premier McNeil. “Continuing the core measures of physical distancing and hand hygiene is how we will keep our case numbers low, especially as we increase gathering limits and welcome Atlantic Canadian visitors to Nova Scotia.”

Effective Friday, July 3, some gathering limits will increase. If a recognized business or organization is planning an event outdoors, 250 people can attend with physical distancing rules in place. For an indoor event, the limit is 50 per cent capacity to a maximum of 200, again with physical distancing.

Gatherings not run by a recognized business or organization, for example a family event in the backyard, are still subject to the 50-person maximum limit with physical distancing unless you’re in your close social group of 10.

The expanded gathering limits apply to social events, faith gatherings, weddings, funerals and other cultural events, and arts and culture events like theatre performances, dance recitals, festivals and concerts. Guidelines for these types of events are available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/docs/Events-theatres-and-venues-COVID-19-prevention-guidelines.pdf

People can continue to gather in close social groups of up to 10 without physical distancing. People in a group are not required to be exclusive but they are strongly encouraged to maintain a consistent group. People should not gather in random or spontaneous groups of 10.

Businesses that are too small to ensure physical distancing can still have no more than 10 people on their premises at a time with as much physical distancing as possible.

In addition, the following restrictions are being eased, effectively immediately:

  • restaurants and licensed liquor establishments can operate at 100 per cent capacity and serve patrons until midnight with appropriate distancing between tables. Patrons must leave by 1 a.m. They must continue to follow their sector plans
  • private campgrounds can operate at 100 per cent capacity. They must continue to follow their sector plan
  • public pools can reopen with physical distancing for lane swimming and aquafit classes, and one or more groups of 10 for other activities based on pool size. They must follow the Nova Scotia Lifesaving Society plan for change rooms and washrooms. It will take municipalities and other public pools time to prepare for reopening
  • people living in homes funded by disability support programs can resume going out into their communities, although it may take time for homes to make arrangements

Dr Strang now recommends that all Nova Scotians wear a non-medical mask in situations where distancing may not be able to be kept, such as in stores, on public transit, or at gatherings. The exceptions are children under two or anyone who has a medical reason for not wearing a mask.

“Reopening our economy and society is important but it also increases risk, so it is paramount that we continue our public health measures to minimize a second wave of COVID-19,” said Dr. Strang. “That includes physical distancing as much as possible, good hand hygiene, cough etiquette, staying home if you’re sick and wearing a non-medical mask when you’re in public places like the grocery store where physical distancing is difficult.”

To date, Nova Scotia has 52,553 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, and 63 deaths. The province currently has no active cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital. Both patients’ COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus . Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia/ .


 

As of today, June 26, Nova Scotia continues to have no active cases of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 468 Nova Scotia tests on Thursday, June 25 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 52,553 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and no active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital. Both patients’ COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

The province is renewing the state of emergency to protect the health and safety of Nova Scotians and ensure the safe re-opening of businesses and services. The order will take effect at noon Sunday, June 28 and extend to noon Sunday, July 12, unless government terminates or extends it.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps and maintain a physical distance when and where required.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia .


 

As of today, June 25, Nova Scotia continues to have no active cases of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

“I am so proud of the commitment Nova Scotians have shown to flattening the curve. We’ve worked together to tackle this virus, but our work is not done. Now is not the time to let our guard down,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “As restrictions are eased, and we head toward an Atlantic bubble, it remains as important as ever to follow all public health guidance and basic hygiene advice – wash your hands, keep your distance and routinely clean and disinfect surfaces.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 687 Nova Scotia tests on Wednesday, June 24 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 52,266 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and no active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital. Both patients’ COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps and maintain a physical distance when and where required.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to June 28

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus


 

June 24, 2020: 

As of today, June 24, Nova Scotia continues to have no active cases of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

Earlier today, the Council of Atlantic Premiers announced travel restrictions in Atlantic Canada will be eased as COVID-19 case numbers remain low in each province. Interprovincial travel within Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador, without the requirement to self-isolate for Atlantic Canadian residents, will be permitted beginning Friday, July 3.

“Nova Scotians and Atlantic Canadians have worked hard to flatten the curve and we’re now in a place where we can ease restrictions within our region. This will allow families to travel and vacation this summer, boosting our tourism and business sectors. We’re looking forward to welcoming our neighbours back,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “I encourage Nova Scotians, and all Atlantic Canadians, to follow public health measures in this province and in any neighbouring province they visit. COVID-19 remains a risk and we must do all we can to prevent this virus from getting a stronger foothold in our region.”

All public health directives present in each province must be adhered to, including not traveling if you have any symptoms of COVID-19 and practising physical distancing and good hand hygiene. Each province will choose their own processes to track and monitor travelers.

Visitors from other Canadian provinces and territories must adhere to the local entry requirements in place in each of the four jurisdictions. Other Canadian visitors to the Maritime provinces who have self-isolated for 14 days may travel within the Maritime region.

The Council of Atlantic Premiers’ full news release can be found at https://immediac.blob.core.windows.net/cap-cmha/images/Newsroom/Draft%20news%20release%20(v7).pdf


June 23, 2020--No New Cases of COVID-19

As of today, June 23, Nova Scotia continues to have no active cases of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

"We have gone two weeks without a new case of COVID-19 and that is because of the efforts of Nova Scotians," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "But we can't get complacent. Please continue to follow the public health measures and stay safe. Please contact 811 if you have symptoms."

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 307 Nova Scotia tests on Monday, June 22 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 51,530 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and no active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Both patients' COVID-19 infections are considered resolved but they are being treated in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.


 

 Nova Scotia Reports One Death, No New or Active Cases of COVID-19

As of today, June 22, Nova Scotia has no active cases of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 63. A male in his 60s with underlying medical conditions died several weeks ago in the Central Zone. His death has been under investigation since then to determine if COVID-19 was a factor. He was not a resident of a long-term care home.

"My thoughts are with this individual's family and loved ones who are grieving these last few days and weeks," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "This virus has taken a lot from us, but we will stay vigilant in our fight to protect Nova Scotians as we work to reopen our province."

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 355 Nova Scotia tests on Sunday, June 21 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 51,242 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 63 deaths and no active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. One person is currently in the ICU. Their COVID-19 infection is considered resolved but they remain in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

 


As of today, June 19, Nova Scotia has one active case of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

 "Today marks our tenth day of no new cases of COVID-19 and I'm very encouraged by our progress. We've achieved this because Nova Scotians have taken this virus seriously and followed public health protocols and advice," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "Please enjoy this beautiful weather and time with your friends and family responsibly. While we've been able to loosen restrictions, it is important that everyone remains vigilant."

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 543 Nova Scotia tests on Thursday, June 18 and is operating 24-hours.

 

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

o date, Nova Scotia has 50,540 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths and one active COVID-19 case. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine-hundred and ninety-eight cases are now resolved. Two people are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. One patient's COVID-19 infection is considered resolved but they remain in hospital. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

 


 As of today, June 18, Nova Scotia has two active cases of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 580 Nova Scotia tests on Wednesday, June 17 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 50,240 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths and two active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Two individuals are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-seven cases are now resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.


 

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health for Nova Scotia, announced today, June 18, changes to gathering limits given Nova Scotia’s low rates of COVID-19.

“We’ve now had well over a week with no new cases of COVID-19 and low rates for the last several weeks. That is thanks to Nova Scotians who have been following public health protocols,” said Premier McNeil. “Our aim is to safely open as much of the economy and our province as we can so that Nova Scotians and the business community can have a good summer. The core measures of social distancing and good hygiene that have kept case numbers low will stay in place. But effective today, household bubbles are down and gathering limits are up.”

People can now gather in groups of up to 10 without physical distancing. People in a group are not required to be exclusive but they are strongly encouraged to maintain a consistent group. This is especially important for Nova Scotians who are more at risk of complications from COVID-19. This change replaces the concept of family household bubbles.

Gatherings of up to 50 will now be allowed but people must observe physical distancing of two metres or six feet.

The larger gathering limit of 50 applies to social events, faith gatherings, sports and physical activity, weddings and funerals, and arts and culture events like theatre performances, dance recitals, festivals and concerts.

Businesses that are too small to ensure physical distancing can have no more than 10 people on their premises at a time. Effective today, playgrounds can start reopening. Municipalities and other owners of playgrounds will need time to prepare them for reopening so Nova Scotians should not expect them to be open immediately.

“We’re providing a new option for close social interaction because it’s important for our well-being, but everybody needs to make decisions that take into consideration the risks, their own circumstances, and how they help keep everyone safe,” said Dr. Strang. “It’s important that we all continue physical distancing as much as possible, good hand hygiene, cough etiquette, staying home if you’re sick and making informed decisions about the groups and activities we choose to join.”

To date, Nova Scotia has 50,240 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths, and two active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Two individuals are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-seven cases are now resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia/ .



As of today, June 17, Nova Scotia has two active cases of COVID-19. The last new case was identified on June 9.

“The past few months have been difficult for our province and it’s great to see Nova Scotians start to return to our day-to-day lives,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “As the weather gets nicer, I encourage everyone to get outside and experience all that our province has to offer. But please continue to take care, be safe and follow public health advice and rules.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 505 Nova Scotia tests on Tuesday, June 16 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 49,775 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths and two active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Two individuals are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-seven cases are now resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

When a new case of COVID-19 is confirmed, public health works to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with that person. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from those not in your household or family household bubble and limit planned gatherings of people outside your household or family household bubble to no more than 10.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

 

No New Cases of COVID-19

 As of today, June 16, Nova Scotia has 1,061 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Monday, June 15.

 "Today marks our seventh day in a row with no new cases of COVID-19. Each and every Nova Scotian has made sacrifices to get us to this place," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "And while we can all be pleased with our progress, it's vital we remain vigilant. Please continue to follow all guidelines and do everything you can to keep our province safe."

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 355 Nova Scotia tests on June 15 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 49,398 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths, and two active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Two individuals are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-seven cases are now resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

As of today, June 15, Nova Scotia has 1,061 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Sunday, June 14.

Starting today, June 15, visits can resume at long-term care facilities and homes for persons with disabilities funded by the Department of Community Services under the Homes for Special Care Act. The visits must happen outdoors and visitors are required to stay two metres or six feet away from residents and staff. Individual facilities will communicate directly with residents and their families to arrange visits. All facilities must follow COVID-19 guidelines outlined by public health.

"COVID-19 has been hardest on seniors and those with disabilities living in nursing and special care homes. It has been lonely and difficult, but it has been necessary," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "I understand it is not the long-awaited hug you have been craving, but sitting in the fresh air for a visit with a loved one is a good first step. If we do this properly and keep everyone safe, you will be able to get that hug when the time is right."

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 456 Nova Scotia tests on June 14 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

To date, Nova Scotia has 49,100 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths, and three active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Two individuals are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-six cases are now resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

 


 

Day camps across Nova Scotia can reopen provided they have a plan in place to address public health measures.

Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health, released COVID-19 guidelines all summer day camps must follow, today, June 12.

“With these guidelines, children will have opportunities to learn, grow, be active, and have fun this summer in an environment that’s safe for them, their families and staff,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “This is an important step for Nova Scotia families to have more support and some sense of normalcy this summer.”

Guidelines for day camps are based in part on child care guidelines which were created with input from infection control experts at the IWK Health Centre.

“Every day camp that wants to reopen must have a plan in place to mitigate risks,” said Dr. Strang. “Our guidelines will help day camp operators develop plans that are tailored to their activities.”

The guidelines also include feedback from some day camp providers. They offer guidance on how day camps can prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19, manage disease outbreaks, advise staff on the use of personal protective equipment and outline public health measures that address physical distancing, hygiene practices, cleaning practices, outdoor activities and other considerations.

Based on these guidelines, all day camp operators must have an individual plan in place to support reopening. Plans will cover key areas such as:

  • increased cleaning
  • staggered pick up and drop off times
  • screening staff and campers
  • limiting group sizes to 10, keeping the same groups of children together
  • multiple groups are allowed but they must be kept separated
  • increased hand washing and minimizing sharing of equipment

Day camps will communicate directly with families about their specific reopening plans.

Quick Facts:

  • day camps are run by a variety of organizations such as municipalities, universities, recreation facilities, and others
  • day camps that choose to open must have plans based on the guidelines but do not need to submit them for approval

There will be no COVID-19 media briefing today, June 12. Government will continue to issue news releases on new cases each day.

As of today, June 12, Nova Scotia has 1,061 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Thursday, June 11.

"Our numbers are moving in the right direction, with no new cases of COVID-19 to report again today," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "As we work to reopen our province, I encourage Nova Scotians to continue to follow the public health protocols and keep one another safe."

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 739 Nova Scotia tests on June 11 and is operating 24-hours.

There are no licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19.

The province is renewing the state of emergency to protect the health and safety of Nova Scotians and ensure the safe re-opening of businesses and services. The order will take effect at noon Sunday, June 14 and extend to noon Sunday, June 28, unless government terminates or extends it.

Nova Scotia's licensed child care centres and family daycare homes will reopen on Monday, June 15. Visits can also resume as early as June 15 at long-term care homes and homes for persons with disabilities.

To date, Nova Scotia has 47,726 negative test results, 1,061 positive COVID-19 cases, 62 deaths, and four active COVID-19 cases. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Two individuals are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-five cases are now resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. Cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia/ .

Province Updates Data, Reports No New Cases of COVID-19

As of today, June 10, Nova Scotia has 1,061 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified June 9.

The province has reconciled and consolidated data sources to ensure all publicly reported data comes from a single source, Panorama, the province's public health reporting system. Updated data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

"Nova Scotia is the first province in the country to integrate our lab data with our public health reporting system," said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health. "Panorama is the gold standard and gives us the most up-to-date and comprehensive COVID-19 data."

This change altered some data points. The total number of cases increased by one additional case, to reflect a Nova Scotian who tested positive for COVID-19, but who is not currently in the province and was not tested here. The 'recovered' category has been renamed 'resolved' to more accurately account for all COVID-19 cases whose investigations are considered completed and closed by public health. The breakdown of total number of cases by location is now based on the Nova Scotia Health Authority zone of the individual's residence, not where their sample was collected for testing.

 

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Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health, announced today, June 10, the easing of some visitor restrictions in long-term care homes and homes for persons with disabilities .

Effective Monday, June 15, visits can resume at long-term care facilities, provided they happen outdoors and visitors stay two metres or six feet away from residents and staff.

This change also applies to homes funded by the Department of Community Services under the Homes for Special Care Act.

"The COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for all of us but in many ways, it has been hardest on our seniors in nursing homes and those living in homes for persons with disabilities," said Premier McNeil. "That's why we are easing visitor restrictions while keeping many of our public health directives in place to protect our most vulnerable."

Individual long-term care facilities and homes for persons with disabilities will communicate directly with residents and their families to arrange visits.

"I can only imagine how tough it has been for long-term care residents and participants in homes for persons with disabilities to not be able to connect with their loved ones," said Dr. Strang. "Outdoor visits are a way to bring residents and their friends and families back together safely."

To ensure resident and visitor safety, the following measures will be in place:
-- visits will only take place outdoors, in designated areas on the facility's grounds
-- a maximum of two visitors may attend at one time
-- visitors must maintain physical distance of two metres or six feet
-- visitors must be screened for COVID-19 upon entry and wear a non-medical mask; anyone with symptoms will not be permitted to enter
-- visitor information must be logged, including date and time of visit to the facility
-- visitors who are self-isolating are not permitted to enter the facility or grounds
-- visits will be monitored by staff, who will escort visitors to the designated area and provide personal protective equipment if needed

Facilities will be provided with materials to support this change, including screening guidelines and staff education materials.

Quick Facts:
-- there are 132 long-term care facilities in Nova Scotia that are home to almost 8,000 residents
-- there are over 300 homes for persons with disabilities in Nova Scotia with more than 2,000 people living in them
-- visitors have not been permitted at long-term care facilities since March 15

Additional Resources:
Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll-free)

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)
For help or information about domestic violence 24/7

 

 


 

Data sources are being reconciled and consolidated to ensure all publicly reported data comes from a single source, Panorama, the province's public health reporting system. Updated data will be reported this week.
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Today, June 9, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 62. The death involved a female in her 70's with underlying medical conditions in the Central Zone. She was not a resident of a long-term care home.

As of today, Nova Scotia has 1,060 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Monday, June 8.


As of today, June 8, Nova Scotia has 1,059 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Sunday, June 7.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 293 Nova Scotia tests on June 7 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with an active case of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has one resident and no staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives – practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from those not in your household or family household bubble and limit planned gatherings of people outside your household or family household bubble to no more than 10.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .


 

Communities will be able to celebrate their 2020 graduates this year, provided they are led by an established organization and follow public health guidelines to ensure celebrations are safe.

Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health for Nova Scotia, announced today, June 5, an exemption under the Public Health Act order to allow community organizations, businesses or municipalities to hold celebrations to recognize graduates due to the loss of traditional graduation ceremonies.

All public high schools in Nova Scotia will recognize and honour Grade 12 graduates receiving diplomas. This will be separate from any celebrations that might be held in the community.

All non-school based, community celebrations of graduates must be held by a recognized business, municipality or community organization (like a club, association, society, volunteer group, faith-based group), and the local municipality, police and fire departments and EHS must be informed and supportive of the planned event.

“Graduation ceremonies are an important tradition not only for the students who worked so hard to get there, but for their loved ones who supported them along the way,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “The class of 2020 is moving on from high school during a unique time and while their festivities will look different this year, there are ways to celebrate safely. Congratulations to all of the graduates of 2020. I know the last few months of school looked quite a bit different, but I hope you’re proud of all you’ve accomplished.”

“Living with COVID-19 continues to be a balance for us all. Unfortunately, students leaving school this year won’t have a traditional graduation ceremony or prom,” said Dr. Strang. “We want to support communities in recognizing these students, but it’s vital these celebrations are done safely, without risking the health of participants.”

Conditions under the exemption include:

  • attendees must arrive in a vehicle
  • all passengers in the vehicle must be from a single household or household bubble
  • graduates can be out of their vehicle to do things like cross a stage or take part in a parade of graduates as long as physical distance (two metres or six feet) is maintained between all graduates while they are out of their vehicle
  • organizers must communicate clearly with attendees in advance and ensure other public health protocols, like physical distancing, are followed

A full list of the conditions and protocols under this exemption can be found at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/community-celebration-graduates .


As of today, June 5, Nova Scotia has 1,058 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Thursday, June 4.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 773 Nova Scotia tests on June 4 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has one resident and one staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 44,477 negative test results, 1,058 positive COVID-19 test results and 61 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Three individuals are currently in hospital, two of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-seven individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .



 

Today, June 4, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 61. The death involved a male in his 70’s with underlying medical conditions in the Central Zone; he was not a resident of a long-term care home.

“My thoughts are with those who are mourning the loss of a loved one today,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “I recognize the public health measures make it difficult for families and friends to grieve. We must remain vigilant and continue to support our neighbours as our province begins the work to recover from COVID-19.”

As of today, June 4, Nova Scotia has 1,058 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Wednesday, June 3.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 893 Nova Scotia tests on June 3 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has three residents and one staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 43,911 negative test results, 1,058 positive COVID-19 test results and 61 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Three individuals are currently in hospital, one of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-five individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


Nova Scotia’s licensed child care centres and family daycare homes will reopen June 15.

Child care centres will open beginning at a minimum 50 per cent capacity and can move up to 100 per cent if they are able to meet public health’s COVID-19 guidelines for child care settings. Family daycare homes will open at full capacity. All facilities must follow COVID-19 guidelines outlined by public health.

“I want to thank licensed child care providers and families for their patience and understanding since the COVID-19 pandemic began,” said Zach Churchill, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. “Now, we are working together to support centres to open in a manner that follows the public health guidelines provided to all licensed providers."

The public health guidelines were created with input from pediatrics at the IWK Health Centre and includes feedback received through a sector-led consultation with more than 2,500 participants. The guidelines provide guidance on how centres can prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19, manage disease outbreaks, advise staff on the use of personal protective equipment and outline public health measures that address physical distancing, hygiene practises, cleaning practises, outdoor activities and other considerations.

Based on these guidelines, all licensed child care providers are required to have an individual site-based plan in place to support reopening. They will communicate directly with families in the coming days about their specific reopening plans. Plans will include measures such as:

  • increased cleaning
  • staggered pick-up and drop-off times
  • limit the number of essential visitors entering the facility
  • have children sleep six feet apart during nap time
  • create groups so the same children are together every day
  • limit contact with other groups in the centre
  • practise social distancing among staff, visitors and other groups when and where possible

Government will also provide hand sanitizer and single-use surgical masks to licensed facilities for the next six months.

Families will not be required to pay fees if they cannot access their child care space or are not ready to return. Providers will receive funding on a sliding scale until September as they increase their capacity from 50 per cent in accordance with public health guidelines. Families are encouraged to talk to their providers regarding timing of re-enrolling their child in licensed child care. The public health guidance document will be made available online later today.

Quick Facts:

  • licensed child care and family daycare homes under an agency closed on March 17.
  • since the mandated closure, government has provided $35 million to the sector to ensure they are ready to welcome families back when its time to reopen
  • there are 342 licensed child care providers and 13 family daycare home agencies that support more than 220 family daycare homes across the province
  • in May, a sector-led group of licensed child care representatives consulted with more than 2,500 of its members to advise public health on what they require to reopen.

 


 As of today, June 2, Nova Scotia has 1,057 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Monday, June 1.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 532 Nova Scotia tests on June 1 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has three residents and two staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 42,861 negative test results, 1,057 positive COVID-19 test results and 60 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Five individuals are currently in hospital, two of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and ninety-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives – practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from those not in your household or family household bubble and limit planned gatherings of people outside your household or family household bubble to no more than 10.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia/ .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to June 14

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll-free)

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)

For help or information about domestic violence 24/7, call 1-855-225-0220 (toll-free)


Novel coronavirus COVID 19 cases in Nova Scotia data visualization6

As of today, June 1, Nova Scotia has 1,057 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Sunday, May 31.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 626 Nova Scotia tests on May 31 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 10 residents and four staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

-- fever (i.e. chills, sweats)

-- cough or worsening of a previous cough

-- sore throat

-- headache

-- shortness of breath

-- muscle aches

-- sneezing

-- nasal congestion/runny nose

-- hoarse voice

-- diarrhea

-- unusual fatigue

-- loss of sense of smell or taste

-- red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 42,426 negative test results, 1,057 positive COVID-19 test results and 60 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Six individuals are currently in hospital, two of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and eighty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


 EZNIQNGXYAAi6f7

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health for Nova Scotia, announced today, May 29, a new gathering limit of 10 and more steps toward reopening the province.

“Nova Scotians have done the hard work to flatten our curve and with that, we will soon be getting back to work, eating in restaurants, getting back to the gym and getting haircuts,” said Premier McNeil. “This next step to allow people to gather in slightly larger groups is good for our mental health and well-being.”

The new gathering limit of 10 is effective immediately. Physical distancing of two metres or six feet is still required, except among members of the same household or family household bubble.

The limit is the same indoors and outdoors, with an exception for outdoor weddings and funeral services which can have 15 people.

The gathering limit applies to things like social gatherings, arts and culture activities like theatre performances and dance recitals, faith gatherings, and sports and physical activity. It also applies to businesses whose main function is gatherings, such as theatres, concerts, festivals and sporting activities, and to businesses that are too small to ensure physical distancing.

Other steps being taken include:

  • starting June 5, private campgrounds can open for all types of campers. They can only operate at 50 per cent capacity and must ensure public health protocols are followed including adequate distance between campsites
  • provincial campgrounds will open to Nova Scotians on June 15, with the reservation line opening June 8. They will operate at a reduced capacity to ensure a minimum of 20 feet between individual campsites
  • pools can start maintenance work to prepare for reopening, likely in time for summer
  • sleepover camps are not permitted this year

“As we create more opportunities for Nova Scotians to regain some normalcy in their lives, it’s important that we all continue to take protective measures like good hand hygiene, cough etiquette and staying home if you’re sick,” said Dr. Strang. “It’s also important for people to think about their own health and circumstances in order to make good decisions about the activities they choose to do.”

To date, Nova Scotia has 40,914 negative test results, 1,055 positive COVID-19 test results and 59 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Seven individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and seventy-eight individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus . Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia/ .

 



 

As of today, May 29, Nova Scotia has 1,055 confirmed cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified Thursday, May 28.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 1034 Nova Scotia tests on May 28 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 10 residents and four staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 40,914 negative test results, 1,055 positive COVID-19 test results and 59 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eight individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and seventy-eight individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


 

Novel coronavirus COVID 19 cases in Nova Scotia data visualization5As of today, May 28, Nova Scotia has 1,055 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Two new cases were identified Wednesday, May 27.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 1136 Nova Scotia tests on May 27 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 12 residents and four staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 40,240 negative test results, 1,055 positive COVID-19 test results and 59 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eight individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and seventy-seven individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


Novel coronavirus COVID 19 cases in Nova Scotia data visualization4As of today, May 27, Nova Scotia has 1,053 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Tuesday, May 26.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 533 Nova Scotia tests on May 26 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 12 residents and four staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 39,441 negative test results, 1,053 positive COVID-19 test results and 59 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Seven individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and seventy-five individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health will provide an update today, May 26, at 3:00pm

Today, May 26, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 59. The death involved a female in her 80's with underlying medical conditions in the Central Zone; she was not a resident of a long-term care home.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 11 residents and four staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:
-- fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
-- cough or worsening of a previous cough
-- sore throat
-- headache
-- shortness of breath
-- muscle aches
-- sneezing
-- nasal congestion/runny nose
-- hoarse voice
-- diarrhea
-- unusual fatigue
-- loss of sense of smell or taste
-- red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause


IMG 4176

As of today, May 25, Nova Scotia has 1,051 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Sunday, May 24.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 489 Nova Scotia tests on May 24 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home or unlicensed seniors' facility in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 12 residents and four staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
  • cough or worsening of a previous cough
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches
  • sneezing
  • nasal congestion/runny nose
  • hoarse voice
  • diarrhea
  • unusual fatigue
  • loss of sense of smell or taste
  • red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 38,458 negative test results, 1,051 positive COVID-19 test results and 58 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Six individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and seventy-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

IMG 4166There will be no COVID-19 briefing today, May 21

Today, May 21, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 58. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

As of today, Nova Scotia has 1,046 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Wednesday, May 20.

"Until a vaccine is available, we have to stay vigilant in fighting this virus. We have to find - and adapt to - our new normal," said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health. "That means we have to keep practising good personal hygiene, use physical distancing, limit non-essential travel, stay home when unwell, limit large groups and wear non-medical masks. These measures will remain in place for some time to come, and will continue to be a key part of our fight against this virus.

There are two licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 15 residents and four staff with active cases. One other facility has one resident with an active case.

To date, Nova Scotia has 37,078 negative test results, 1,046 positive COVID-19 test results and 58 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and fifty-nine individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives - practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from those not in your household or family household bubble and limit planned social gatherings of people outside your household or family household bubble to no more than five.


 

Novel coronavirus COVID 19 cases in Nova Scotia data visualization3Nova Scotia Reports One More Death, One New Case of COVID-19

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, will provide an update today, May 20 at 3:00pm 


This update will be livestreamed on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast .

Today, May 20, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 57. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

As of today, Nova Scotia has 1,045 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Tuesday, May 19.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 353 Nova Scotia tests on May 19 and is operating 24-hours.

There are two licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 19 residents and three staff with active cases. One other facility has one resident with an active case.


 


 Novel coronavirus COVID 19 cases in Nova Scotia data visualization2Today, May 19, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 56. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

As of today, Nova Scotia has 1,044 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Monday, May 18.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 384 Nova Scotia tests on May 18 and is operating 24-hours.

There are two licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 19 residents and seven staff with active cases. One other facility has one resident with an active case.

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 36,438 negative test results, 1,044 positive COVID-19 test results and 56 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine individuals are currently in hospital, five of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and fifty-six individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


IMG 4135

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, will provide an update today, May 15, at 3 p.m. They will talk about the easing of some restrictions around COVID-19.

This update will be livestreamed on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast .

Today, May 15, Nova Scotia is reporting four additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 55. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

As of today, May 15, Nova Scotia has 1,034 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Eight new cases were identified Thursday, May 14.

There are three licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 25 residents and 15 staff with active cases. One other facility has one staff member with an active case of COVID-19 and another facility has one resident with an active case.

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, will provide an update today, May 15, at 3 p.m. They will talk about the easing of some restrictions around COVID-19.

 This update will be livestreamed on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast .

Today, May 15, Nova Scotia is reporting four additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 55. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

As of today, May 15, Nova Scotia has 1,034 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Eight new cases were identified Thursday, May 14.

There are three licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 25 residents and 15 staff with active cases. One other facility has one staff member with an active case of COVID-19 and another facility has one resident with an active case.


IMG 4125There will be a briefing Friday, May 15 at 3 p.m.

As of today, May 14, Nova Scotia has 1,026 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Two new cases were identified Wednesday, May 13.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 554 Nova Scotia tests on May 13 and is operating 24-hours.

There are three licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 27 residents and 15 staff with active cases. One other facility has one staff member with an active case of COVID-19 and another facility has one resident with an active case.

 

 

 

 


, May 13, Nova Scotia is reporting three additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 51. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

“On behalf of all Nova Scotians, I offer my sincere condolences to those families who are grieving the loss of a loved one today,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Northwood continues to receive all support possible from the province and our health system partners as we continue to slow the spread of this horrible virus.”

As of today, May 13, Nova Scotia has 1,024 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Four new cases were identified Tuesday, May 12.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 502 Nova Scotia tests on May 12 and is operating 24-hours.

There are three licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 64 residents and 13 staff with active cases. One other facility has one staff member with an active case of COVID-19 and another facility has one resident with an active case.

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 34,604 negative test results, 1,024 positive COVID-19 test results and 51 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Eight-hundred and seventy individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


No Canadian should have to choose between putting food on the table, filling their prescriptions, or paying their bills. Yet too many seniors are facing significant health, economic, and social challenges due to COVID-19. They helped shape this country, and now they need our help.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Government of Canada has introduced measures to support seniors. We invested $1.3 billion in a one-time special payment through the Goods and Services Tax (GST) credit in April. More than 4 million seniors benefited from this top-up, which gave an average of $375 for single seniors and $510 for senior couples. We also invested in community organizations that provide practical services to Canadian seniors, including the delivery of groceries and medications.

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced a series of additional measures to help Canadian seniors and provide them with greater financial security in this time of crisis. These measures include:

  • Providing additional financial support of $2.5 billion for a one-time tax-free payment of $300 for seniors eligible for the Old Age Security (OAS) pension, with an additional $200 for seniors eligible for the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS). This measure would give a total of $500 to individuals who are eligible to receive both the OAS and the GIS, and will help them cover increased costs caused by COVID-19.
  • Expanding the New Horizons for Seniors Program with an additional investment of $20 million to support organizations that offer community-based projects that reduce isolation, improve the quality of life of seniors, and help them maintain a social support network.
  • Temporarily extending GIS and Allowance payments if seniors’ 2019 income information has not been assessed. This will ensure that the most vulnerable seniors continue to receive their benefits when they need them the most. To avoid an interruption in benefits, seniors are encouraged to submit their 2019 income information as soon as possible and no later than by October 1, 2020.

The Government of Canada will continue to monitor and respond to the health, social, and economic impacts of COVID-19. We stand ready to take additional actions as needed to support all Canadians, including seniors, and stabilize the economy.

Quotes

“As workers, neighbours, parents, grandparents, spouses, caregivers, and volunteers, Canada’s seniors have shaped this country and contribute to our communities every day. They are among the most threatened by COVID-19, and we will support them and work to keep them safe.”

The Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

“Protecting the most vulnerable remains at the core of our response to COVID-19, and seniors are particularly feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Whether it be vulnerability due to physical or mental health, isolation, or simply struggling to get groceries and the supports they need, the measures announced today will help seniors during this difficult period.”

The Hon. Bill Morneau, Minister of Finance

“Seniors have helped shape the Canada we know and love today. Supporting seniors during this difficult time is essential. With an additional $300 for OAS recipients plus a further $200 for GIS recipients, we are helping Canadian seniors get the support they need during the pandemic.”

The Hon. Deb Schulte, Minister of Seniors

Quick Facts

  • There are currently 6.7 million seniors who are eligible for the OAS pension and 2.2 million who are eligible for the GIS.
  • The government has taken a number of actions to support seniors through the outbreak of COVID-19, such as:
    • Providing a one-time special payment through the GST credit for low- and modest-income families. Close to 85 per cent of single seniors and almost half of senior couples benefited from this payment.
    • Providing seniors flexibility with their Registered Retirement Income Funds, by reducing minimum withdrawals by 25 per cent for 2020. This will help preserve assets during a volatile market.
    • Contributing $9 million through United Way Centraide Canada for local organizations to support practical services to Canadian seniors. These services could include the delivery of groceries, medications, or other needed items, or personal outreach to assess individuals’ needs and connect them to community supports.
    • Investing $100 million to improve access to food for Canadians, including seniors, facing social, economic, and health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Creating a $350 million Emergency Community Support Fund to support charities and non-profit organizations to adapt the services they provide to vulnerable groups, including seniors, in response to COVID-19.
    • Introducing the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB), a taxable benefit of $2,000 every 4 weeks for up to 16 weeks to eligible workers, including seniors, who have lost their income due to COVID-19. Pension income does not affect eligibility to the CERB. The government also extended the eligibility of this benefit to individuals who earn up to $1,000 per month, as well as workers who have recently exhausted their EI regular benefits and are unable to find a job or return to work because of COVID-19.

 


IMG 4092

As of today, May 12, Nova Scotia has 1,020 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Monday, May 11.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 427 Nova Scotia tests on May 11 and is operating 24-hours.

There are three licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 157 residents and eight staff with active cases. One other facility has one staff member with an active case of COVID-19 and another facility has one resident with an active case.

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 34,204 negative test results, 1,020 positive COVID-19 test results and 48 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Eight-hundred and sixty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

 

IMG 4089Today, May 11, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 48. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality

"It is with heavy hearts we report the passing of another resident at Northwood. My thoughts are with the family and friends of this individual," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "All Nova Scotians are asked to do everything you can to continue to slow the spread of this virus in our province."

As of May 11, Nova Scotia has 1,019 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Sunday, May 10.


 

Students Finish School June 5, Plan for Reopening Nova Scotia Under Development

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health, provided an update on COVID-19 today, May 8, announcing that the school year for students will end June 5 and licensed daycares will remain closed until at least June 5. They also outlined how government will determine the best way to reopen Nova Scotia.

Teachers will continue to work until the end of June to complete assessments and other tasks,

"I have been hearing amazing reports about how students, parents and teachers have been doing with at-home learning," said Premier McNeil. "I want to thank the parents and family members who have done their best to support their children's learning. And I want to thank the education workers who balanced home and work, too. You will have to do this for a little bit longer, but I believe in you and I know you've got this."

The goal is for daycares to reopen by June 8 but the timeline for them to resume operating will be determined in consultation with the sector. Those consultations are underway and will help inform Nova Scotia's reopening plan.

Nova Scotia's reopening plan is under development. It will be based on the following:

-- advice from the Public Health Agency of Canada's recommendations and guidelines to lift public health measures

-- status of COVID-19 in the province

-- consultation with sectors

-- the ability for people and businesses to continue to follow public health measures

"We must take a slow and methodical approach if we are to safely bring Nova Scotia back to normal," said Dr. Strang. "No decisions have been made. We are working on a reopening plan that balances public safety with the need to increase economic and social activity. The first phase is still some weeks away."

Reopening will be done in phases, over time. Each phase could last a minimum of 28 days. Readiness to reopen - and to move onto the next phase - will be assessed weekly.

To date, Nova Scotia has 32,835 negative test results, 1,008 positive COVID-19 test results and 46 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Five individuals are currently in hospital, two of those in ICU. Seven-hundred and twenty-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data


Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, presentation during today's COVID-19 briefing can be found at, https://novascotia.ca/…/COVID-19-planning-for-a-new-normal.…

Schools will remain closed but online learning will continue until June 5. A tentative date for the daycares opening is June 8.


IMG 4081

Today, May 8, Nova Scotia is reporting two additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 46. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

“All Nova Scotians continue to hold Northwood residents and staff in their thoughts. I hope the families grieving today know their province is with them,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Health system partners stand side-by-side with Northwood and our mobilization of efforts to support them will continue for as long as necessary.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has 1,008 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Thursday, May 7.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 840 Nova Scotia tests on May 7 and is operating 24-hours.

There are two licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 156 residents and 38 staff with active cases. One other facility has one staff member with an active case of COVID-19.

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 32,835 negative test results, 1,008 positive COVID-19 test results and 46 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Five individuals are currently in hospital, two of those in ICU. Seven-hundred and twenty-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to May 17

 If you are struggling with alcohol addiction and need support of AA meetings, you can find contact and meeting information here:

http://www.area82aa.org/meetinglistcurrent/district-7pictou-antigonish-guysboro-counties-port-hawsbury?fbclid=IwAR3zhkvetxJ40JOatzWv_-64hhv-aqEn6uYNZHi2U8KxHLqP_aCCEOfSRyc

IMG 4057As of today, May 6, Nova Scotia has 998 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Seven new cases were identified Tuesday, May 5.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 764 Nova Scotia tests on May 5 and is operating 24-hours.

There are three licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 160 residents and 51 staff with active cases. Two other facilities each have one staff member with an active case of COVID-19.

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, will provide an update on COVID-19 in the province today, May 6, at 2 p.m.


In uncertain times, it is more critical than ever for Canadians to have access to good, high quality, and nutritious food. That is why the Government of Canada is taking steps to support the farmers and businesses who provide Canadians with the food they need to keep themselves and their families healthy.

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced important measures within agriculture programs and an investment of more than $252 million to support farmers, food businesses, and food processors who provide essential services to Canadians every day by ensuring a safe and reliable food supply. He also announced that the government intends to propose an additional $200 million in borrowing capacity for the sector.

The Government of Canada will provide targeted support to farmers, ranchers, agricultural producers, and food processors by:

  • Creating a $77.5 million Emergency Processing Fund to help food producers access more personal protective equipment (PPE), adapt to health protocols, automate or modernize their facilities, processes, and operations, and respond to emerging pressures from COVID-19 so they can better supply Canadians with food during this period.
  • Launching a national AgriRecovery initiative of up to $125 million in funding to help producers faced with additional costs incurred by COVID-19. This includes set-asides for cattle and hog management programs to manage livestock backed-up on farms, due to the temporary closure of food processing plants. This new federal funding will help beef and pork producers and processors adapt to a changing market, and help farmers and ranchers keep their animals longer before marketing.
  • Announcing the intention to increase the Canadian Dairy Commission’s borrowing limit by $200 million to support costs associated with the temporary storage of cheese and butter to avoid food waste. The government will work with opposition parties to achieve the required legislative change.  
  • Launching a first-ever Surplus Food Purchase Program with an initial $50 million fund designed to help redistribute existing and unsold inventories, which could include products such as potatoes and poultry, to local food organizations who are serving vulnerable Canadians.
  • Working with provinces and territories to increase interim payments from 50 per cent to 75 per cent through AgriStability, a federal, provincial and territorial program that supports producers who face significant revenue declines. This change has already been enacted in some provinces.
  • Working with provinces and territories to explore possibilities for expanding the AgriInsurance program to include labour shortages as an eligible risk for the horticulture sector. This work with provincial and territorial partners would insure against lost production due to an insufficient workforce, should producers be unable to find enough labour to harvest.

The Government of Canada recognizes all workers across our food supply chain who provide an essential service to our country. We will continue to monitor and respond to the wide-ranging impacts of COVID-19, and take additional actions as needed to protect the health and safety of Canadians, and stabilize the economy.


 

IMG 4027

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, will provide an update today, May Today, May 5, Nova Scotia is reporting three additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 41. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

"Today, sadly, we have to report three more deaths from COVID-19 at Northwood. I offer my condolences to the families and loved ones," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "We are working hard with the Northwood team and our partners have rallied around the home and its residents and staff. We will keep supporting them until this horrible disease is defeated."

As of today, Nova Scotia has 991 confirmed cases of COVID-19. 


REMO Pictou County has put together a long list of frequently asked questions.  Check it out to see if your questions can be answered. 


IMG 4024

Nova Scotia Reports One More Death, Fourteen New Cases of COVID-19

There will be no COVID-19 media briefing today, May 4.

Today, May 4, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 38. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

"I offer my condolences to the family who is grieving the loss of their loved one today," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "We must remain vigilant, especially around our long-term care homes, to protect residents and staff. We have slowed the spread provincially, but we need to stay the course and continue to follow the public health protocols."

As of today, Nova Scotia has 985 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Fourteen new cases were identified Sunday, May 3.

For many Canadians, COVID-19 is having a major impact on their everyday lives, as they work to pay their bills, put food on the table, and take care of themselves and their families. That is why it is more important than ever that Canadians have access to the tools and resources they need to support their health and well-being.

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced an investment of $240.5 million to develop, expand, and launch virtual care and mental health tools to support Canadians.

Working with provinces, territories, and stakeholders, this investment will be used to create digital platforms and applications, improve access to virtual mental health supports, and expand capacity to deliver health care virtually, including projects to reach vulnerable Canadians. These supports will also help ease the burden on our health care system, as we continue to deal with COVID-19. This investment will:

  • help Canadians safely engage with their regular health providers and specialist health services through telephone, text, or video-conferencing;
  • support access to mental health supports and reliable health information in a safe and secure manner, which will reduce the pressure on our health system;
  • help governments, public health officials, hospitals, and health care facilities make evidence-based decisions; and
  • support federal, provincial, and territorial initiatives in collaboration with innovators, health stakeholders, and organizations like Canada Health Infoway, to expand virtual health services to Canadians.

This investment will support Wellness Together Canada, an online portal that provides Canadians with free resources, tools, and professional support services to help with wellness and resilience, as well as mental health and substance use. It will also support a growing family of digital products that includes the Canada COVID-19 app, which helps people track their symptoms, receive the latest updates, and access trusted resources.

With these additional supports, we are helping Canadians access the health resources they need, wherever and whenever they need them. The government will continue to focus on the health, safety, and well-being of all Canadians during these challenging times.


 Today, May 3, Nova Scotia is reporting six additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 37. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

"Six more families are mourning the loss of a loved one today and my thoughts are with them. I am so very sorry for you loss," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "I ask all Nova Scotians to help keep COVID-19 out of our long-term care facilities and our communities by continuing to follow the public health directives to help stop the spread of this virus."

As of today, Nova Scotia has 971 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Eight new cases were identified Saturday, May 2.

"We continue to work with our partners to protect residents and staff at Northwood," said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health. "We all need to continue working together, washing our hands, social distancing and using our common sense to keep fighting this virus."

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 734 Nova Scotia tests on May 2 and is operating 24-hours.

As of May 2, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors' facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 239 residents and 109 staff.

To date, Nova Scotia has 29,945 negative test results, 971 positive COVID-19 test results and 37 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Six individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Six-hundred and twenty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


 

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health, announced today, May 1, the easing of some public health restrictions around COVID-19.

"We know that getting outdoors for recreation is important for people's physical and mental health," said Premier McNeil." That's why we are easing some restrictions, while still keeping the majority of our public health directives in place to continue fighting the virus. But I need to be clear: if we see an increase in positive cases or people not continuing to adhere to all the public health measures, the restrictions will return."

Existing public health directives around social distancing and social gatherings remain in place. People must keep two metres apart and not gather in groups of more than five.

The initial steps are:
-- provincial and municipal parks can reopen, but playground equipment will continue to be off limits
-- trails are allowed to open
-- people are allowed to use and visit community gardens
-- garden centres, nurseries and similar businesses can open
-- sportfishing is permitted from shore or boat, but fishing derbies are not allowed
-- people can attend boating, yacht or sailing clubs for the purpose of preparing boats for use
-- golf driving ranges can open, including those at golf clubs, but the course must remain closed; golf clubs can perform necessary maintenance and preparations for opening
-- people can use their cottages. Use is restricted to one household unit at a time, travel must be directly to the cottage and back, and travelling back and forth frequently from cottage and primary residence is discouraged
-- provincial and private campgrounds remain closed, but they can perform necessary maintenance and preparations for opening. An exception is recreational vehicles parked year-round at private campgrounds, which can be used but must follow the same rules as cottages
-- drive-in religious services will be allowed, as long as people stay in their cars, they are parked two metres apart and there are no interactions between people in cars or between people in cars and others

These measures take effect immediately.

Details on these adjustments can be found at, https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/

"Our ability to open things up further - for example, beaches, golf courses and campgrounds -- depends on how each of us does with these adjustments, how well Nova Scotians comply and how the pandemic continues to impact people's health," Dr. Strang said. "We can't let our guards down. We need to continue to flatten the curve."

A phased plan to further lift public health restrictions is under development. It is based on science and the timing of each phase will be determined by the result to the easing of restrictions.

To date, Nova Scotia has 28,883 negative test results, 959 positive COVID-19 test results and 29 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Five-hundred and ninety-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/datQuick Facts:
-- testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
-- a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to May 17, 2020

 


IMG 4012

Today, May 1, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 29. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

"The thoughts and best wishes of all Nova Scotians are with everyone at Northwood. To the family and loved ones of this individual, please accept our deepest condolences," said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Many people, representing many organizations, are working hard to help Northwood address this virus. This support will continue as long as it is needed.”As of today, Nova Scotia has 959 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twelve new cases were identified Thursday, April 30.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 812 Nova Scotia tests on April 30 and is operating 24-hours.

As of April 30, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 237 residents and 105 staff.

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health will provide an update today, May 1, at 3 p.m. They will also announce the easing of some public health restrictions around outdoor and recreational activities.

This update will be livestreamed on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast .

The province is renewing the state of emergency for another two weeks under the authority of the Emergency Management Act for the protection of the health and safety of Nova Scotians.

 The order will take effect at noon Sunday, May 3 and extend to noon Sunday, May 17, unless government terminates or extends it.

 Quick Facts:

-- a state of emergency was declared on March 22

-- a copy of the renewed order will be available at: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/alerts-notices


 

As of today, April 30, Nova Scotia has 947 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twelve new cases were identified Wednesday, April 29.

“I want to thank all Nova Scotians for their patience and vigilance – we will get through this together,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “I urge you all to keep practising good hygiene and maintaining social distance.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 901 Nova Scotia tests on April 29 and is operating 24-hours.

“Now is not the time to let our guard down,” said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health. “What we are doing is working to slow this virus’ spread and we need to stay the course. Please continue to follow public health orders and advice.”

As of April 29, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 235 residents and 104 staff.

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 28,209 negative test results, 947 positive COVID-19 test results and 28 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Five-hundred and forty-five individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

 


Novel coronavirus COVID 19 cases in Nova Scotia data visualization

Today, April 29, Nova Scotia is reporting one additional death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 28. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

“On behalf of all Nova Scotians, I extend my heartfelt condolences to the family and loved ones of this individual. We will continue to work diligently with our partners to make sure we do everything we can to protect residents and staff at Northwood and all of our long-term care homes from this terrible disease,” said Premier Stephen McNeil.

As of today, Nova Scotia has 935 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty new cases were identified Tuesday, April 28.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 905 Nova Scotia tests on April 28 and is operating 24-hours.

As of April 28, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 227 residents and 97 staff. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 27,486 negative test results, 935 positive COVID-19 test results and 28 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Five-hundred and twenty-nine individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Premier Stephen McNeil announced plans today, April 28, to continue at-home learning until at least Tuesday, May 19.

Following the recommendation of Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, all public schools and licensed child care providers will remain closed until then to prevent the spread of COVID-19. These closures will be reassessed as that date approaches.

"Thank you to our students, parents and teachers. I am hearing wonderful reports about your work with at-home learning," said Premier McNeil. "Keep up the good work. Students - be good to your parents, listen to your teachers and keep learning."

During school closures, students and families will continue to have access to e-learning and at-home options that will be assignment and project focused, so they may can continue their education.


Today, April 28, Nova Scotia is reporting three additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 27. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality

"Three more families are grieving losses in our province today and my heart goes out to them at this incredibly difficult time," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "We are working with our partners to ensure Northwood has the support they need to try to stop this virus."

As of today, Nova Scotia has 915 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Fifteen new cases were identified Monday, April 27.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 483 Nova Scotia tests on April 27 and is operating 24-hours.


 

IMG 3979

As of today, April 24, Nova Scotia has confirmed 850 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-three new cases were identified Thursday, April 23.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 888 Nova Scotia tests on Thursday, April 23 and is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia has conducted more COVID-19 tests per capita than any other province.

As of April 23, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 189 residents and 82 staff.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

fever
new or worsening cough
sore throat
runny nose
headache
To date, Nova Scotia has 24,521 negative test results, 850 positive COVID-19 test results and 16 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Three hundred and ninety-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


IMG 3973Today, April 23, Nova Scotia is reporting four additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 16. Three occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality and the other occurred at Harbourstone Enhanced Care in Sydney.

“Our hearts ache for those who have lost a loved one to COVID-19. All Nova Scotians send their support and condolences to the families and friends of those who have passed,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “The entire health-care system has rallied around Northwood and we continue to provide support and guidance to all long-term care homes to address this virus.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has confirmed 827 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Fifty-five new cases were identified Wednesday, April 22.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 921 Nova Scotia tests on Wednesday, April 22 and is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia has conducted more COVID-19 tests per capita than any other province.

As of April 22, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 158 residents and 79 staff. While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.


 

NSHA launches support for First Responders

Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) is launching a new service called First Responders Assist. 
 
This service will offer short-term counselling and supportive services, including follow up if needed, for first responders and their families impacted by the tragedies of April 18 and 19 in  Colchester County, the Municipality of East Hants and Cumberland County
 
NSHA’s Mental Health and Addictions Program and Nova Scotia Operational Stress Injury Clinic (OSI) have collaborated to provide this joint response OSI is a term used to describe any persistent psychological difficulty resulting from operational or service-related duties.
 
First Responders Assist can be accessed by calling toll-free 1-888-429-8167 and this line is staffed by mental health professionals 24/7. 
 
When calling, first responders and their family members should indicate they have been impacted by the tragedy. The mental healthcare provider will provide immediate assistance and connect the first responder or their family member with counselling and supportive services, including follow up treatment if needed. 
 
NSHA's mental health team is here to connect using telephone and video support. For someone whose needs require to be seen in-person, an appointment will be arranged, following public health pandemic protocols to keep everyone safe. 

Mental Health and Addictions supports are available for people and families. The Provincial Mental Health Crisis Line is available 24/7 for anyone experiencing a mental health crisis or someone concerned about them. Call (toll-free) 1-888-429-8167.

If you would like to self-refer to our Community Mental Health and Addictions clinics, Withdrawal Management Services, or Opioid Replacement and Treatment Program, call (toll-free) 1-855-922-1122, weekdays 8:30 to 4:30. This line has voicemail only evenings, weekends, and statutory holidays. Access to supports are also available online mental health services

If anyone has mental health or addiction related concerns or concerned about someone else, please do not hesitate to contact us.


IMG 3935Today, April 22, Nova Scotia is reporting two additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 12. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

“I extend my condolences to the families and loved one of these individuals – you are in the thoughts of all Nova Scotians. My heart goes out to everyone at Northwood at this time and we are working very closely with our partners to continue to implement an emergency plan to help bring this virus under control at the facility,” said Premier Stephen McNeil.

As of today, Nova Scotia has confirmed 772 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-five new cases were identified Tuesday, April 21.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 849 Nova Scotia tests on Tuesday, April 21 and is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia has conducted more COVID-19 tests per capita than any other province.

As of April 21, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 148 residents and 65 staff. While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 22,993 negative test results, 772 positive COVID-19 test results and 12 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Three hundred and thirty individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today, April 21, Nova Scotia is reporting another death related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 10. The death occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

“This is a deeply sad day for the family and loved ones of this individual, as well as everyone at Northwood. Nova Scotians offer their heartfelt condolences to them,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “We will all get through this extraordinarily difficult time by pulling together and supporting each other.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has confirmed 737 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Sixteen new cases were identified Monday, April 20.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 516 Nova Scotia tests on Monday, April 20 and is operating 24-hours.

As of April 20, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 128 residents and 62 staff.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 22,190 negative test results, 737 positive COVID-19 test results and 10 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Two hundred and eighty-six individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .


 

As of April 19, there were nine licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 127 residents and 61 staff. While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 21,769 negative test results, 721 positive COVID-19 test results and nine deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Twelve individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Two hundred and forty-eight individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .


 

Today, April 19, Nova Scotia is reporting two more deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to nine. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

“On behalf of all Nova Scotians, I extend my deepest condolences to the families and friends of these two individuals,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “I want to assure everyone, but particularly those who live and work at Northwood, that the health-care system has mobilized to help you through this.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has 675 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-six new cases were identified Saturday, April 18.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 856 Nova Scotia tests on Saturday, April 18 and is operating 24-hours.

As of April 18, there were eight licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 93 residents and 54 staff.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 21,120 negative test results, 675 positive COVID-19 test results and nine deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Two hundred individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to May 3

Today, April 18, Nova Scotia is reporting three more deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to seven. The deaths occurred Friday, April 17, at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality. An update on the situation will be provided Sunday, April 19.

“My greatest fear was that this virus would make its way into our long-term care homes,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “I was so sad to learn of this devasting loss of life. We are working with Northwood to implement an emergency plan to isolate the virus and protect your loved ones.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has 649 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Forty-three new cases were identified Friday, April 17.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 1,310 Nova Scotia tests on Friday, April 17 and is operating 24-hours. The lab has now completed more than 20,000 samples so far.

As of April 17, there were eight licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 67 residents and 48 staff. While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 20,312 negative test results, 649 positive COVID-19 test results and seven deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, five of those in ICU. One-hundred and eighty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data . Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to May 3

 


 

The province is renewing the state of emergency under the authority of the Emergency Management Act for the protection of the health and safety of Nova Scotians.

Cabinet met Thursday, April 16 by teleconference and agreed to ask the lieutenant governor to extend the state of emergency for another two weeks. The order will take effect at noon Sunday, April 19 and extend to noon Sunday, May 3, unless government terminates or extends it.

Quick Facts:

Nova Scotia has recorded its fourth death related to COVID-19. Today, April 17, a female in her 80’s in Cape Breton died as a result of complications related to COVID-19.

“Its with great sadness that I have to tell you that another Nova Scotia family is now grieving the loss of a loved one as result of COVID-19,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “As I offer them my heartfelt condolences, I want to emphasize to all Nova Scotians that we must all continue to work together to fight this terrible disease.”

As of today, April 17, Nova Scotia has 606 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-seven new cases were identified Thursday, April 16.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 966 Nova Scotia tests on Thursday, April 16 and is operating 24-hours.

As of April 16, there were eight licensed long-term care homes in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 55 residents and 43 staff.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 19,506 negative test results, 606 positive COVID-19 test results and four deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, five of those in ICU. One-hundred and seventy-seven individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to April 19

Government released COVID-19 projections today, April 14, that show how COVID-19 could progress through the province through to June 30 if people continue to follow public health orders to stay home, social distance, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and practise good hygiene.

Today, Nova Scotia reported 517 positive cases of COVID-19. According to the projections, if Nova Scotia had not put strong public health measures in place, the province could have instead had 943 cases as of today. They also show that if Nova Scotians continue to follow public health orders, there could be 1,453 cases by June 30, but with poor compliance, cases could grow to 6,269 over that time period. It is important to note the numbers are only modelling estimates.

The projections show a flattened peak in total cases in May that continues into June if public health measures continue.

“The public health directives we’ve put in place are working,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “These projections clearly show complying with social distancing and other measures can save lives. But we have to stay vigilant. The coming weeks are crucial, and we must continue to follow the protocols.”

Testing has proven to be effective. The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia is second in Canada in the number of people tested per million.

Other highlights of the projections include:

  • without public health measures, the model projects hospitalizations of COVID-19 cases would peak at about 85 in May then slowly begin to decline. With strongly sticking to public health orders there would be a peak of about 35 in May and then decline throughout June
  • currently, the most cases in the province are in the Dartmouth/southeastern community health network, almost double of nearby Halifax

The pandemic modelling was developed by staff from the Department of Health and Wellness, Nova Scotia Health Authority and IWK Health Centre. Details can be found here, https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/modelling/

COVID 19 Modelling Page 03

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 16,755 negative test results, 517 positive COVID-19 test results and three deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. One-hundred and twenty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to April 19
  • there are 22 primary assessment centres in Nova Scotia: 21 operated by Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) and one operated by the IWK Health Centre, temporary primary assessment centres are operating in two communities
  • two mobile assessment centres are being established by NSHA to do community-based testing; Emergency Health Services operates two field assessment units, one in Halifax Regional Municipality and one in Cape Breton Regional Municipality

This week Pictou County residents will be getting a newsletter in their mailboxes from REMO Pictou County. There are few reasons why the decision was made to provide this:

- There are a wide variety of resources available for people to use, but not everyone knows where to find information about those. We want people to have information available from the province as well as local community contact numbers.
All of this provincial information and more is also available on https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/

- We want people to know that REMO is looking out for their best interests under the leadership of Coordinator John Davison who works with the six municipal units and province to activate a local emergency action plan. Municipal and provincial representatives are in daily contact to make sure essential services such as police, fire, public works, and more are being offered to Pictou County residents during the COVID-19 crisis.

- Lastly, we want to make sure everyone was reached – Not everyone has access to the internet or buys newspapers. This way, we could make sure everyone had access to this important information about testing, social distancing, self-isolation, provincial information and community supports.

Thank you,
The Pictou County Regional Emergency Management Organization

REMO-Newsletter-final.pdf


As of today, April 14, Nova Scotia has 517 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Forty-three new cases were identified Monday, April 13.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 1,476 Nova Scotia tests on Monday, April 13 and is operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 16,755 negative test results, 517 positive COVID-19 test results and three deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. One-hundred and twenty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to April 19
  • there are 22 primary assessment centres in Nova Scotia: 21 operated by Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) and one operated by the IWK Health Centre, temporary primary assessment centres are operating in two communities
  • two mobile assessment centres are being established by NSHA to do community-based testing; Emergency Health Services operates two field assessment units, one in Halifax Regional Municipality and one in Cape Breton Regional Municipality

 

Nova Scotia has recorded its third death related to COVID-19. Today, April 13, a male in his 80’s in Halifax Regional Municipality died as a result of complications related to COVID-19.

“Tragically, another family is grieving the loss of a loved one as result of COVID-19,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “As I offer to them my heartfelt condolences, I want to emphasize to all Nova Scotians that we cannot afford to become complacent. Life is precious and we must all work together to protect those who are dear to us.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has 474 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-nine new cases were identified Sunday, April 12.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 947 Nova Scotia tests on Sunday, April 12 and is operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 15,580 negative test results, 474 positive COVID-19 test results and three deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Nine individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. One-hundred and one individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.


 

New Measures for Long-Term Care, Home-Care Workers

Front-line workers in every public and private long-term care home, residential care facility and home-care agency across the province will now be expected to wear masks to help reduce the spread of COVID-19. Distribution to workers began over the weekend.

Effective Tuesday, April 14, masks will be distributed to all front-line workers in residential care and continuing care facilities and to home-care employees.

"Masks are in high demand around the world and we wanted to be sure we had the supply before we started to distribute," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "I know front-line staff are concerned and I'm sorry if we contributed to that. But I can tell you that making sure we have adequate supplies is a full provincial effort - with government and the private sector working together to protect front-line workers who are working to protect Nova Scotians every day."

 Details include:

-- the protocol applies to nursing homes and residential care facilities licensed by the Department of Health and Wellness and to private, unlicensed assisted-living facilities, retirement homes, memory-care homes and enriched-care homes

-- home-care workers must also wear a mask under the protocol

-- the protocol also applies to direct-care staff in residential facilities funded by the Disability Support Program and licensed by the Minister of Community Services under the Homes for Special Care Act: adult residential centres, regional rehabilitation centres, residential care facilities, small option homes, developmental residences and group homes

-- all facilities must continue to get masks through existing supply chains. Government will only provide masks to these facilities on an emergency basis

-- government is partnering with the Health Association of Nova Scotia to distribute the masks to all facilities

"We're now seeing increased community spread and we know from other jurisdictions that this means an increase in cases in long-term care facilities," said Dr. Robert Strang chief medical officer of health. "It's almost impossible for people working in long-term care facilities to practise physical distancing given they are helping people who need hands-on care. Wearing a surgical mask is another measure we can use to prevent further spread of infection and protect healthcare workers and those most at risk of becoming severely ill."

Nova Scotia has recorded three deaths related to COVID-19 and a total of 474 positive test results. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Nine individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. One hundred and one individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

As of today, April 12, Nova Scotia has 445 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Seventeen new cases were identified Saturday, April 11.

“On a weekend when many of us would be visiting family and observing tradition, let’s honour those working on the front lines the best way we can - by staying home,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Thank you to everyone who is staying in, minimizing contact with others and helping to stop the spread of COVID-19.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 778 Nova Scotia tests on Saturday, April 11 and is operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

“The only way we can overcome this deadly virus is by working together and supporting each other in following public health direction,” said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health. “None of this is easy. But it’s vitally important for every Nova Scotian to do their part to keep their fellow citizens safe, especially those most at risk, including everyone providing an essential service.”

To date, Nova Scotia has 14,295 negative test results, 445 positive COVID-19 test results and two deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Nine individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Ninety-seven individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .


Surgical services at Aberdeen Hospital to reopen April 11

Thursday, April 9, 2020

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. – Surgical services at the Aberdeen Hospital will reopen on Saturday, April 11, 2020 at 8:00 a.m.  The resumption of services includes urgent and emergency general surgery, orthopedic surgery, and gynecological/obstetrical cases, including routine delivery care and C-sections.

The services had to temporarily close on April 2 after a hospital employee tested positive for COVID-19.

When a person in the workplace is identified as having COVID-19, or becomes ill, our Occupational Health Safety and Wellness (OHS&W) team leads the response process and completes detailed contact tracing to determine their level of contact with other staff and physicians. This is similar to the investigations conducted by Public Health when there is a case in the community.

The OHS&W team works closely with Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) to help identify any possible patient contacts and required follow-ups. As a result of these processes, a number of staff and physicians were advised to self-isolate and have undergone testing.

Close monitoring has now assessed that staff and physicians can be considered COVID negative and therefore safe to return to work.

There was no direct patient contact in this case.

Any Aberdeen Hospital maternity patients whose care had been temporarily diverted to Colchester East Hants Health Centre in Truro or St. Martha’s Regional Hospital in Antigonish will again be supported in New Glasgow.

                                                             

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, gave an update today, April 9, on efforts related to COVID-19.

Measures announced today include:

-- applications for the $40 million Worker Emergency Bridge Fund and Small Business Impact Grant will be available and accepted starting Friday, April 10. Applications for small business will be online at 8 a.m. A toll-free phone line for applications for the worker fund will be open starting at 8 a.m. Call 1-800-863-6582 after checking eligibility online. See https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/#support  for more information.

-- payment for more than 480 small-business fees will be deferred until June 30 to keep cash in small business hands

-- to help people who need additional supports, 211 will launch Saturday, April 11, a new service to connect people needing COVID-19 assistance with the Canadian Red Cross. The Red Cross will act as a navigator to link people to the services they need. In addition, the Red Cross will offer wellness check-ins for Nova Scotians who are isolated and experiencing loneliness and anxiety

-- private campgrounds must close until May 1, when the measure will be reassessed

-- only veterinarians working with the SPCA may carry out spay and neuter surgeries

-- the order under the Health Protection Act has been amended to require workers in the fishing and offshore industries to self-isolate when they enter the province

Nova Scotia has recorded its second death related to COVID-19. On Wednesday, April 8, a woman in her 90s with underlying medical conditions died in the Cape Breton Regional Hospital as a result of complications related to COVID-19.

“The death of a loved one is never easy. Unfortunately, this virus makes the loss of a family member all the more difficult,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “I want to offer my sincere condolences to the family as they grieve. Together, we have the power to stop this disease.”

As of today, April 9, Nova Scotia has 373 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-one new cases were identified Wednesday, April 8.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 980 Nova Scotia tests on Wednesday, April 8 and is operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 12,177 negative test results, 373 positive COVID-19 test results and two deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Eighty-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

 

As of today, April 8, Nova Scotia has 342 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-two new cases were identified Tuesday, April 7.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed more than 700 Nova Scotia tests on Tuesday, April 7 and is now operating 24 hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 11,346 negative test results, 342 positive COVID-19 test results and one death. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, five of those in ICU. Seventy-seven individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to April 19
  • there are 22 primary assessment centres in Nova Scotia: 21 operated by Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) and one operated by the IWK Health Centre, temporary primary assessment centres are operating in two communities
  • two mobile assessment centres are being established by NSHA to do community-based testing; Emergency Health Services operates two field assessment units, one in Halifax Regional Municipality and one in Cape Breton Regional Municipality
  • the first death in the province was on April 6 - a woman in her 70s with underlying medical conditions died in hospital in the Eastern Zone as a result of complications related to COVID-19

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll free).

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free).

The Government of Canada is taking unprecedented action to support workers, businesses, and all Canadians impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Right now, young people are facing serious challenges finding work. To build the foundations of strong communities, we need a strong workforce that includes good job opportunities for youth. That is why the government is working to help employers adapt to the realities of COVID-19, and supporting young Canadians as they begin to look for summer employment.  

Today, the Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, announced temporary changes to the Canada Summer Jobs program that will help employers hire summer staff and provide young Canadians access to the jobs they need during this unprecedented time. This program will help create up to 70,000 jobs for youth between 15 and 30 years of age.

Canada’s small businesses increasingly depend on the employment of young Canadians. The changes to the Canada Summer Jobs program will help small businesses hire and keep the workers they need so they can continue to deliver essential services.

The temporary changes to the program for this year include:

  • an increase to the wage subsidy, so that private and public sector employers can also receive up to 100 per cent of the provincial or territorial minimum hourly wage for each employee
  • an extension to the end date for employment to February 28, 2021
  • allowing employers to adapt their projects and job activities to support essential services
  • allowing employers to hire staff on a part-time basis

These changes will help youth stay connected to the labour market, save money for their future, and find quality jobs in safe, inclusive, and healthy work environments.

Today’s announcement builds on the government’s action taken for young Canadians during this crisis. This includes a six-month, interest-free moratorium on Canada Student Loans, and a 75 per cent wage subsidy for businesses that will help more employers keep part-time employees and workers over the coming months. Despite these important steps, there is still more to do for students and young Canadians. The Government of Canada will continue to look for ways to support all Canadians, including students and young people, as we weather this pandemic together.

The Canada Summer Jobs program provides opportunities for youth to develop and improve their skills within the not-for-profit, small business, and public sectors, and supports the delivery of key community services. By adapting the program this year, the Government of Canada is making sure that we have the resources needed to support Canadian workers, businesses, and communities dealing with the social and economic impacts of COVID-19.

Quotes

“Small businesses and community organizations are the backbone of our economy, and a critical lifeline for communities across this country. They are facing economic hardship and unprecedented service demands during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that is why we are taking action now to get them the financial help they need to keep their doors open and support their communities.”

The Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

“In these extraordinary times, we realize the impacts small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and public sector employers have on our economy and our communities. Our role is to support them. This is why the Government of Canada has made changes to the Canada Summer Jobs program, so that we can help employers help their communities through good quality, safe job placements for youth.”

The Hon. Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion

Quick Facts

  • The changes to the Canada Summer Jobs program complement the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan, which committed $107 billion in support to Canadians and businesses facing hardship as a result of COVID-19.
  • The Canada Summer Jobs call for applications for the 2020 season closed on February 28, 2020. In response to the economic impacts created by the COVID-19 situation, we will work with Members of Parliament to identify organizations that provide essential services in the community and could provide youth jobs but did not apply for the Canada Summer Jobs program in 2020.
  • The Government of Canada has earmarked $263 million in funding for the Canada Summer Jobs program in 2020. This funding will help create up to 70,000 jobs for youth between 15 and 30 years of age, and we will be working with employers to explore work options that reflect the latest public health advice.
  • Job placements could begin as early as May 11, 2020, and end as late as February 28, 2021.
  • Youth will be able to search for jobs available in their communities through the Job Bank website and app.
  • In previous years, private and public sector employers were only eligible to receive a wage subsidy of up to 50 per cent of the provincial or territorial minimum wage. The increase to the wage subsidy for private and public sector employers will be for this year only.

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As of today, April 7, Nova Scotia has 310 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Seventeen new cases were identified Monday, April 6.

As reported earlier today, the province has also recorded its first death.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed more than 530 Nova Scotia tests on Monday, April 6 and is now operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why we have removed travel as a requirement for testing for COVID-19. Visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for assessment. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

To date, Nova Scotia has 10,621 negative test results, 310 positive COVID-19 test results and one death. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital. Sixty-six individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to April 19
  • there are 22 primary assessment centres in Nova Scotia: 21 operated by Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) and one operated by the IWK Health Centre, a temporary primary assessment centre is now operating in Elmsdale
  • two mobile assessment centres are being established by NSHA to do community-based testing; Emergency Health Services operates two field assessment units, one in Halifax Regional Municipality and one in Cape Breton Regional Municipality
  • the first death in the province was on April 6 - a woman in her 70s with underlying medical conditions died in hospital in the Eastern Zone as a result of complications related to COVID-19

April 7, 2020

As of today, April 7, Nova Scotia has 310 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Seventeen new cases were identified Monday, April 6.

As reported earlier today, the province has also recorded its first death.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed more than 530 Nova Scotia tests on Monday, April 6 and is now operating 24-hours.


Nova Scotia Reports First COVID-19 Death

Nova Scotia has recorded its first death related to COVID-19. On April 6, a woman in her 70s with underlying medical conditions died in hospital in the Eastern Zone as a result of complications related to COVID-19.

“I had hoped this day would never come and I’m deeply saddened that a Nova Scotia family is going through this,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “My deepest condolences go to the family and friends who are grieving today.”

“This virus is dangerous. We have to work to slow it down to protect ourselves, those we love and everyone in our communities so that no other family has to suffer a loss like this.”

Updated COVID-19 case numbers will be shared later today, April 7, at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19, they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine whether they should call 811 for further assessment.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus


April 6, 2020

Nova Scotia Education and Early Child Development:   We will begin to distribute Grade primary to 9 learning packages in your flyer package beginning Wednesday. Flyers are being delivered to 340,000 homes, and learning packages will also be available online, via teachers and in communities at grocery stores.


April 6, 2020

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, gave an update today, April 6, on efforts to help further protect the province's seniors and to expand testing criteria.

"I know it has been difficult for people during this time but following public health advice will ensure we flatten the curve," said Premier McNeil. "Now more than ever we need to stay home. But we also need you to care for your loved ones, for those in your community and for those vulnerable Nova Scotians who need you more than ever."

New measures announced today:

-- removing travel as a requirement to be referred for testing for COVID-19 now that community spread is present in Nova Scotia. An assessment is still required through 811, which will refer you to an assessment centre, if required. Visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ for more information

-- Dr. Strang has directed licensed long-term care homes to follow measures to further prevent the introduction of the virus into these homes and to reduce its spread if introduced to the facility. The directive includes a number of provisions, including cleaning, monitoring of residents and staff, testing, and reporting. The directive and the measures were provided to the sector today and are effective immediately

" As we see the beginning of community spread, it is critical we take further measures to protect our family members in long-term care homes," said Dr. Strang. " The directive will ensure that each facility, regardless of size, has all the information and resources to protect our seniors in their care."

To date, Nova Scotia has 10,218 negative test results and 293 confirmed cases. Those cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Sixty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved.

Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus

 


As of today, April 6, Nova Scotia has 293 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-one new cases were identified Sunday, April 5.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 650 Nova Scotia tests on Sunday, April 5.

While most cases in Nova Scotia to date have been connected to travel or a known case, it is now known there is community spread. This is expected and why the testing strategy continues to be adjusted. Part of that is increasing lab capacity. The lab will begin 24/7 operations today, April 6.

To date, Nova Scotia has 10,218 negative test results and 293 positive COVID-19 test results. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital. Sixty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.


As of today, April 5, Nova Scotia has 262 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-six new cases were identified Saturday, April 4.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 592 Nova Scotia tests on Saturday, April 4.

While most cases in Nova Scotia to date have been connected to travel or a known case, it is now known there is community spread. This is expected and why the testing strategy continues to be adjusted. Part of that is increasing lab capacity. Processing at the lab is moving to 24/7 operations on Monday, April 6.

To date, Nova Scotia has 9,510 negative test results and 262 confirmed cases. Those cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Six individuals are currently in hospital. Fifty-three individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to issue orders and directives to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and recently extended to April 19

Women’s and children’s unit temporarily closed for labour and deliveries at Aberdeen Hospital

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. - The inpatient women’s and children’s unit at Aberdeen Hospital in New Glasgow is temporarily closed for labour and deliveries, including for any planned deliveries, until further notice. 

Pregnancy and delivery care will be provided at Colchester East Hants Health Centre in Truro or St. Martha’s Regional Hospital in Antigonish depending on the patients’ home location.

If you are expecting to deliver in the next few days you will be contacted directly by a member of the maternity team to discuss an alternate birth plan with you.

In the event of an emergency or unplanned delivery, there will be an obstetrician and nursing staff available at Aberdeen Hospital to support pregnancy care. Prenatal care will continue to be provided by the hospital’s team.   


 As of today, April 3, Nova Scotia has 207 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Fourteen new cases were identified Thursday, April 2 and almost 900 COVID-19 tests were completed at the QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab.

While most cases in Nova Scotia are connected to travel or a known case, as reported previously, there is one confirmed case of community transmission and more cases are expected to present.

To date, Nova Scotia has 8,234 negative test results and 207 confirmed cases. Those cases range in age from under ten to over 80. Five individuals are currently in hospital. Twenty-one individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to issue orders and directives to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and recently extended to April 19

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

 


 

April 2, 2020

Measures to Help Citizens, Businesses Affected by COVID-19
---------------------------------------------------------------
Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, gave an update today, April 2, on efforts to help Nova Scotians dealing with COVID-19.

"Our small businesses and those who are self-employed have always been at the heart of our economy but now that COVID-19 is here, layoffs and closures have slowed the pace of our economy," said Premier McNeil. "Our economic support plan has added two new programs that will put more than $40 million in the pockets of those out of work and small businesses affected by COVID-19. The goal is to begin processing applications early next week - to get cash out the door as quickly as possible."

New measures announced today:
-- a $20 million Worker Emergency Bridge Fund to help the self-employed and those laid-off workers who do not qualify for Employment Insurance. The government will provide a one-time, $1,000 payment, to bridge the gap between layoffs and closures and the federal government's Canada Emergency Response Benefit
-- $20 million to fund a new program -- the Small Business Impact Grant. Eligible small businesses and social enterprises will receive a grant of 15 percent of their gross revenues -- either from April 2019 or February 2020, up to a maximum of $5,000. This flexible, one-time, upfront grant can be used for any purpose necessary

Today's announcements, totalling $40 million, will come out of a new $50 million fund that will be administered by Dalhousie University in Halifax.

Eligibility for the programs is not affected by a person or business being enrolled in another provincial program or federal initiatives.

An announcement on when the programs are ready for applications will come early next week.

Other measures announced today include:
-- the current state of emergency is extended until noon, April 19
-- a new extended hours phone line has been set up for people wanting information on income assistance eligibility from the Department of Community Services. Call toll-free 1-833-722-1417 from Monday to Friday from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. During regular business hours, Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. call the regular toll-free line at 1-877-424-1177.

To date, Nova Scotia has 7,446 negative test results and 193 confirmed cases. Those cases range in age from under 10 to over 80. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is now available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

"As I have said before, we have cases in all parts of the province," said Dr. Strang. "So it is imperative that all Nova Scotians follow the public health directives and orders - practise good hygiene, keep a distance of two metres or six feet away from others, limit essential gatherings to five or fewer people, and self-isolate for 14 days after travel or if you have come in contract with a known case."

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:
-- testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
-- Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:
Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

NSHA advising of potential COVID-19 exposure at Westville funeral home and Alma fire hall
NSHA Public Health is advising of potential exposure to COVID-19 on Sunday, March 15 at Eagles Funeral Home in Westville, and the Alma Fire Hall.
 
This notification is being made out of an abundance of caution as Public Health now starts contact tracing 48 hours before symptom onset. These events fell within that 48-hour period.
 
People who may have been exposed at the funeral home or fire hall are just past the 14-day period where they should self-monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. If you were at those locations and you have developed any symptoms of COVID-19 since then, please call 811. This will help NSHA Public Health to identify any connected cases and will aid in containment efforts. 
 
COVID-19 symptoms include:
  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
If you have COVID-19 symptoms:
  • Take the COVID-19 online self-assessment questionnaire to determine if you need to call 811. 
  • If needed, call 811 for assessment. Please self-isolate until you receive 811 advice on next steps.
  • Do not go directly to a COVID-19 assessment centre without being directed to do so by 811.
When NSHA Public Health makes a public notification it is not in any way a reflection on the behavior or activities of those named in the notification.
 
All Nova Scotians are advised to continue monitoring for COVID-19 symptoms and are urged to follow Public Health guidelines on how to access care. Up to date information about COVID-19 is available at novascotia.ca/coronavirus
 

As of today, April 2, Nova Scotia has 193 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty new cases were identified Wednesday, April 1, and 900 COVID-19 tests were completed at the QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab.

While most cases in Nova Scotia are connected to travel or a known case, as reported previously, there is one confirmed case of community transmission and more cases are expected to present.

To date, Nova Scotia has 7,446 negative test results and 193 confirmed cases. Those cases range in age from under ten to over 80. Five individuals are currently in hospital. Sixteen individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is now available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

 

COVID 2 Textiles 1

As of today, April 1, Nova Scotia has 173 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-six new cases were identified Tuesday, March 31, and more than 1,000 COVID-19 tests were completed at the QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab.

While most cases in Nova Scotia are connected to travel or a known case, as reported previously, there is one confirmed case of community transmission and more cases are expected to present.

 Of the 26 new cases of COVID-19, one is a staff member at The Magnolia residential care home in Enfield. That makes three staff members and two residents of The Magnolia who have tested positive. The residents are in isolation and staff members are isolating at home. All residents are being monitored for symptoms of COVID-19 including temperature checks twice daily. To date, two other nursing homes in Nova Scotia each have one staff member who has tested positive. They are isolating at home and appropriate infection prevention and control measures are in place at facilities across the province.


April 1st, 2020

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March 31, 2020
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Important information for Tax and Community Transportation Operations. Taxi+community+transportation+info March+31+2020

 

As of today, March 31, Nova Scotia has 147 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Twenty new cases were identified Monday, March 30. Most cases are connected to travel or a known case. As reported yesterday, public health has concluded that one case is the result of transmission within the community. To date, four staff and two residents of long-term care facilities have tested positive for COVID-19. Appropriate infection prevention and control measures are in place for both residents and staff.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives – practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

The individuals affected range in age from under ten to over 80. Four individuals are currently in hospital. Ten individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province.

Public health is working to identify people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

To date, Nova Scotia has 5,763 negative test results and 147 confirmed cases.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.


 

Canadian businesses and manufacturers are stepping up to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. The Government of Canada is working with these companies to ensure our health care workers have the tools they need to care for Canadians across the country.

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced progress under Canada’s Plan to Mobilize Industry to fight COVID-19, which increases Canada’s ability to respond to the outbreak with necessary medical equipment and supplies.

The Government of Canada is investing $2 billion to support diagnostic testing and to purchase ventilators and protective personal equipment, including for bulk purchases with provinces and territories. Personal protective equipment includes things like more masks and face shields, gowns, and hand sanitizer.

On March 20, 2020, the Government of Canada called on Canadian businesses and manufacturers to help deliver critical health supplies. Since then, the government has spoken directly with almost 3,000 Canadian companies that have offered their expertise and capacity to meet the country’s need for personal protective equipment and critical health supplies.

The Government of Canada has signed new procurement agreements with Canadian companies Thornhill Medical, Medicom, and Spartan Bioscience to purchase and boost capacity to manufacture equipment and supplies including portable ventilators, surgical masks, and rapid testing kits. The government has ordered millions of supplies to ease the pressure on health care facilities. It has also signed letters of intent with five companies – Precision Biomonitoring, Fluid Energy Group Ltd., Irving Oil, Calko Group, and Stanfield’s – to produce additional test kits, hand sanitizer, and protective apparel including masks and gowns.

The government welcomes the cooperation of other companies and industries that have answered the call to action and offered their support in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes efforts from companies to re-tool their facilities and double their production capacity, to collect and donate existing supplies and equipment, and to combine resources to manufacture needed supplies more quickly. Companies like Magna, General Motors, Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada, Ford, Linamar, Shell, Suncor, Alibaba Group, and The Home Depot have helped Canada’s health care professionals by donating personal protective and safety equipment and sanitizing supplies.

In addition, $50 million has been made available in funding for members of the Next Generation Manufacturing Supercluster to develop and scale-up new, in-demand technologies, equipment, and medical products. This includes technologies and products to test and treat Canadians, such as novel virus detection tests, vaccines, therapeutics, and symptom management treatments. It also includes medical equipment to care for Canadians, such as ventilators, peripherals, personal protective equipment, and cleaning and sterilization chemicals and equipment.

These measures are part of the larger strategy the Government of Canada is implementing to protect Canadians and prevent the spread of the virus. Collaboration with Canadian manufacturing and innovation is an important part of this strategy, which will ultimately result in better health and safety for Canadians, as well as a more resilient health care system.

 

 

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March 30, 2020

Premier Stephen McNeil announced plans today, March 30, to support ongoing student learning as Nova Scotians deal with COVID-19.

Following the recommendation of Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health, all public schools and licensed child care providers will remain closed until at least May 1.

No student will be penalized because of COVID-19. Students and families will have access to e-learning and at-home learning materials will be provided for students without internet access. Families who feel at-home learning may be a burden are asked to speak to their child’s teacher.

“These are extraordinary times and that requires innovation and co-operation.” said Premier McNeil. “We are focused on math and literacy, we are making sure Grade 12s who were on track to graduate will graduate, but we also want to make sure families have what they need to support learning at home.”

Students who were on track to graduate will graduate and Grade 12 students who need a preliminary paper-based transcript for bursaries, scholarships or university entrance will receive one by contacting their Regional Centre for Education or Conseil scolaire acadien provincial (CSAP). Students who were on track to proceed to their next grade will move to their next grade on time. Students will receive end of year report cards.

During the ongoing closure of public schools:

  • all Grade primary to 9 students will receive at-home learning packages distributed bi-weekly by SaltWire Network
  • students in grades 10 to 12 who require at-home learning packages will work with their individual teachers to address their specific needs; additional information on distribution will be forwarded to schools
  • learning will be assignment and project focused
  • a dedicated learning website for families is available at https://curriculum.novascotia.ca/learning-home
  • all school trips planned for May and June are cancelled
  • Provincial Assessments, Nova Scotia Exams and final exams in all courses are cancelled
  • Diplôme d'Études en Langue Française (DELF) and International Baccalaureate (IB) exams are cancelled
  • students in grades 9 to 12 will receive additional access to the Homework Hub, a free online resource and tutoring for math
  • teachers will connect directly with students and families to help support learning

Students and families will continue to have access to student support services. SchoolsPlus facilitators and community outreach workers continue to support students and families via phone, email and text. The facilitators are also available to accept new referrals to support students and families not currently using SchoolsPlus. Mental health clinicians continue to work with students and their families by phone, secure video conferencing or in person, where possible. For those who require additional supports, ask your teacher or principal and they will connect you to the support you need.

To better support students and adults with special needs, the province is modifying existing policies and agreements to allow teaching assistants and child and youth care support workers to provide paid respite care in the community.

Next year, teachers will help students prepare for their new grade and conduct additional review.

“Nova Scotia’s Learning Continuity Plan is meant to be flexible and provide the most support possible to students in these challenging times.,” said Zach Churchill, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. “Co-operation is critical in making this work and I want to thank teachers, principals, unions and administrators for keeping a shared focus on the health and education of our students.”

Additionally, the province has created an online tool to help businesses and non-profits clarify if they may remain open and how they can comply with public health orders and workplace safety requirements. This tool is available at https://covid19-employer-assessment.novascotia.ca/en .

Five new cases were identified Sunday, March 29. Most are connected to travel or a known case. To date, Nova Scotia has 5,054 negative test results and 127 confirmed cases.

It is imperative that anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia self-isolate for 14 days and for everyone to adhere to the five-person social gathering limit. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and remains in effect until noon, April 5
  • under the state of emergency government can control or prohibit assembly as well as travel to and from areas. It can also coordinate commerce activity and emergency responders
  • a new virus like COVID-19 can cause fear. Nova Scotians are encouraged to support each other and use technology to stay connected

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll free).

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free).

 

March 29, 2020

As of today, March 29, Nova Scotia has 122 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Twelve new cases were identified yesterday. Most are connected to travel or a known case.

Public health is working to identify people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days. At this point, public health cannot confirm community spread as several cases are still under investigation.

The 12 individuals affected range in age from under 10 to mid-70s. Three individuals are currently in hospital. Seven individuals have recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province.

A non-resident at the Magnolia residential care home in Enfield has tested positive. Residents, their families and staff at the facility have been notified. Public Health is continuing to investigate and is working closely with the facility administrators. While no residents or other staff are showing symptoms, some are now in self-isolation as a precautionary measure and close contacts are being tested. There are no cases of COVID-19 among residents of long-term care facilities in Nova Scotia.

“I am still hearing stories of people driving to our parks and beaches – even though they are closed. Grocery stores packed, groups out playing sports,” said Premier McNeil. “These people are the reckless few and not only are Dr. Strang and I upset with them, their fellow Nova Scotians are upset with them. To those reckless few: if you won’t do your part to keep physical distance to help flatten the curve, police will do it for you.”

To date, Nova Scotia has 4,731 negative test results and 122 confirmed cases.

It is imperative that anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia self-isolate for 14 days and for everyone to adhere to the five-person social gathering limit. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

“The recent cases in the homes for seniors is a strong reminder that our older population is more vulnerable: They need our help and they deserve our vigilance,” said Dr. Strang, Nova Scotia’s medical officer of health. “Everyone has to take great care if they know they will be in contact with our vulnerable people, like our seniors and those with autoimmune issues. If you are feeling unwell at all, it is very important that you stay home and maintain social distancing.”

If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or have been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/ .

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and remains in effect until noon, April 5
  • under the state of emergency government can control or prohibit assembly as well as travel to and from areas. It can also coordinate commerce activity and emergency responders
  • a new virus like COVID-19 can cause fear. Nova Scotians are encouraged to support each other and use technology to stay connected

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll free)

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)

 

As of today, March 28, Nova Scotia has 110 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Twenty new cases were identified Friday, March 27. Most are connected to travel or a known case.

Public health is working to identify people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days. At this point, public health cannot confirm community spread as several cases are still under investigation.

The 110 individuals affected range in age from under ten to mid-70's. Three individuals are currently in hospital. Four individuals have recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province.

An employee at R.K. MacDonald Nursing Home in Antigonish has tested positive for COVID-19, while an employee at Lewis Hall, a private retirement living community in Dartmouth, has also tested positive.

All residents, their families and staff at both facilities have been notified. Public Health is continuing to investigate and is working closely with the facility administrators. While no residents or other staff are showing symptoms, some are now in self-isolation as a precautionary measure and close contacts are being tested. There are no cases of COVID-19 among residents of long-term care facilities in Nova Scotia.

"The weekend is here and we need to be more vigilant than ever. We can't let our guard down," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "Only go out if necessary and obey the physical distancing rules. And stay connected with your loved ones and neighbours. We will all get through this together."

To date, Nova Scotia has 4,031 negative test results and 110 confirmed cases.

It is imperative that anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia self-isolate for 14 days and for everyone to adhere to the five-person social gathering limit. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/  and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

"Given the number of returning travellers, including snowbirds, and more testing being done, an increase in cases is expected," said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health. "We're three weeks into our response and I know this is hard for everyone. Please continue to be part of flattening the curve by following public health advice and direction."

If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/ .

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Additional Quotes:

"The health and safety of our residents and staff are our top priority and with the increased risks of COVID-19 on our resident population, we have been taking measures to protect them. Once we were notified of a case within our staff, we reacted quickly to take the appropriate steps to further protect, test and monitor our residents and support several of our staff to self-isolate and protect themselves from the potential risk. We will continue to be diligent through these uncertain times."

     -- Michelle Thompson, CEO, R.K. MacDonald Nursing Home

"While this has been an unsettling day for the residents, families and team members at Lewis Hall, we have been preparing our teams for this circumstance for some time. We took early and concrete steps to implement our pandemic plan, including strict employee screening measures, visitor restrictions, and reinforcing our infection prevention and control practices. Today, we moved quickly in collaboration with Public Health to notify residents, families and team members, and have taken additional appropriate precautions when interacting with residents."

     -- Jason Shannon, President and COO, Shannex

 

Quick Facts:

-- testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus

-- Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

-- a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and remains in effect until noon, April 5

-- under the state of emergency government can control or prohibit assembly as well as travel to and from areas. It can also coordinate commerce activity and emergency responders

-- a new virus like COVID-19 can cause fear. Nova Scotians are encouraged to support each other and use technology to stay connected

 

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll free)

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)


 

 

saltwire papers

March 28, 2020

If you are wondering about things that can and can't be done under Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act, read this FAQ. It involves child care, enforcement of the act, fines, exercise, travel and more. Click here to read all about it. 

March 28, 2020

Frozen Favourites Program 2020 Pictou Page 2

Frozen Favourites Program 2020 Pictou Page 4March 27, 2020

The Aberdeen Walk In Clinic will be temporarily closed beginning on Monday, March 30 in an effort to minimize community spread of COVID-19.

March 27, 2020

Nova Scotia’s sportfishing season is on hold until at least May 1.
The season normally begins on April 1, however, with the current state of emergency around COVID-19, Nova Scotians are encouraged to stay at home.

“Nova Scotians love to fish, however, this delay is consistent with the closure of parks, beaches and other activities where people gather,” said Fisheries and Aquaculture Minister Keith Colwell. “Some Nova Scotians have already purchased 2020 sportfishing licenses and I want them to know those licenses will be valid once the season opens.”

Learn to Fish activities have been cancelled this year and no permits will be issued to host trout derbies.

March 27, 2020

Due to the Coronavirus/Covid-19 conditions, all locations of the Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library, including Books by Mail, will be closed until further notice. The decision to reopen will be made in consultation with Nova Scotia Public Health authorities. 

All loan periods for physical books and items have been extended to May 1, 2020.  Our Book Returns are also closed, so please keep your borrowed library materials with you, until we reopen. 

To access library services available online (such as eBooks (audio and print), eMagazines, eNewspapers and historical e-resources), please visit www.parl.ns.ca.

Questions? You can reach the library by phone and email. Please call/text 1(902) 759-2310 (Mondays to Fridays, 10am to 3pm) or by email  info@parl.ns.ca, anytime. 

If you need a new library card, please call, email or text, .. or fill out the online library card registration form.
March 27, 2020
NSHA Public Health is advising of potential public exposures to COVID-19:
  • March 11 – Highland Eye Care at 193 Dalhousie Street, New Glasgow
  • March 12 – Charles V. Keating Centre at 1100 Convocation Blvd., Antigonish (event was Bantam AAA Provincial Hockey Championship)

People who were present at those locations on the specified dates are asked to monitor for COVID-19 symptoms. 

“People who may have been exposed on these dates are just past the 14-day period where they should self-monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. If you were at those locations and you have developed any symptoms of COVID-19 since then, please call 811. This will help us to identify any connected cases and will aid our containment efforts,” said Dr. Daniela Kempkens, Regional Medical Officer of Health.  
 
COVID-19 symptoms include:
  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Pneumonia
If you have COVID-19 symptoms:
  • Take the COVID-19 online self-assessment questionnaire to determine if you need to call 811. 
  • If needed, call 811 for assessment. Please self-isolate until you receive 811 advice on next steps.
  • Do not go directly to a COVID-19 assessment centre without being directed to do so by 811.
All Nova Scotians are advised to continue monitoring for COVID-19 symptoms and are urged to follow Public Health guidelines on how to access care. Up to date information about COVID-19 is available at novascotia.ca/coronavirus

As of today, March 27, Nova Scotia has 90 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Seventeen new cases were identified Thursday, March 26. Most are connected to travel or a known case. None of the new cases are connected to the St. Patrick’s Day gathering in Lake Echo, Halifax Regional Municipality. All attendees at the event are being contacted and are being tested. Case investigations are ongoing. At this point, public health cannot confirm a link to community spread.

It is imperative that anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia self-isolate for 14 days and for everyone to adhere to the five-person social gathering limit. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19 they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ and use the online assessment tool. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

The 90 individuals affected range in age from under ten to mid-70's. Two individuals are currently in hospital. Three individuals have recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province.

Public health is working to identify people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

To date, Nova Scotia has 3,649 negative test results and 90 confirmed cases.

If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and remains in effect until noon, April 5
  • under the state of emergency government can control or prohibit assembly as well as travel to and from areas. It can also coordinate commerce activity and emergency responders
  • A new virus like COVID-19 can cause fear. Nova Scotians are encouraged to support each other and use technology to stay connected

March 26, 2020

Premier Stephen McNeil, Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Brendan Carr, president and CEO of Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) and Dr. Krista Jangaard, president and CEO of IWK Health Centre gave an update today, March 26, on the health system and efforts to help Nova Scotians dealing with COVID-19.

“Our health-care system is being examined from top to bottom to ensure we are ready for COVID-19,” said Premier McNeil. “Our hospital administrators, our doctors and nurses, cleaning staff – everyone is focused on containing the spread. But none of this matters if you don’t stay at home and avoid social gatherings.”

Dr. Strang said testing to confirm COVID-19 is being expanded to include:

  • anyone referred by 811 to an assessment centre
  • all close contacts of people who test positive
  • people in hospital that meet the criteria for testing

An alternate phone line has been set up to ensure health-care workers are virus-free, able to safely provide care and not burden the 811 system. The service deals with NSHA and IWK staff, home-care and long-term care providers, pharmacists and health providers in First Nations communities.

“Over the next two weeks as travellers come home, we need to control and limit spread of this virus,” said Dr. Strang. “We can do this by strictly following public health measures – physical distancing and self-isolation.”

Other measures announced today include:

  • reservations for the 2020 camping season are on hold; an announcement will made when they are available
  • open fires are banned for any purpose in woods or within 305 metres of woods in any part of the province and will be in effect until May 15 (the public can report wildfires by calling 911 in an emergency or by calling 1-800-565-2224)

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quotes:

I want to reassure IWK patients and families across Nova Scotia and those living in P.E.I., New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador that we are still here for you. Your urgent care needs will continue to be met and you will be permitted to cross the border for urgent and specialized appointments.Dr. Krista Jangaardpresident and CEOIWK Health Centre

While most people are being told not to go to work, our staff and physicians are showing up every day to ensure Nova Scotians get the care they need. As we continue to plan, prepare and respond to COVID-19, we appreciate your patience, support and co-operation with the important public health measures that are in place. This will help reduce the impact the pandemic will have on Nova Scotians and our health system. It is a difficult time for everyone, but if we all do our part, we will reduce the spread of the virus and life will return to normal sooner.Dr. Brendan Carrpresident and CEONova Scotia Health Authority

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and remains in effect until noon, April 5
  • under the state of emergency government can control or prohibit assembly as well as travel to and from areas. It can also coordinate commerce activity and emergency responders
  • a new virus like COVID-19 can cause fear. Nova Scotians are encouraged to support each other and use technology to stay connected

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll free).

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free).

March 26, 2020

This is an excellent website to stay up to date on local businesses and who is open. Congrats to the Pictou County Regional Enterprise Network for stepping up and filling a need. You can find the website at www.pictoucounty.com. Check it out.

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March 26, 2020

What is REMO?  Do you know that the Regional Emergency Management Organization is currently helping the six local municipal units put their emergency management plans in place during the COVID-19 crisis? Learn more about REMO here.


 

As of today, March 26, Nova Scotia has 73 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Five new cases were identified Wednesday, March 25. Most are travel-related or connected to earlier cases. One of the new cases cannot currently be linked to travel or an earlier case. The investigation to determine the source of the exposure and whether any others may have been exposed is ongoing. At this point, public health cannot confirm that this case is linked to community spread.

That is why it is imperative that anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia to self-isolate for 14 days and for everyone to adhere to the five-person social gathering limit.

The 73 individuals affected range in age from under ten to mid-70's. Two individuals are currently in hospital. Two individuals have recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province.

Public health is working to identify people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

To date, Nova Scotia has 3,201 negative test results and 73 confirmed cases.

If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

 

March 25, 2020
REMO PC MEDIA RELEASE 004

March 25,2020

As of today, March 25, Nova Scotia has 68 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Seventeen new cases were identified Tuesday, March 24. The cases are travel-related or connected to earlier reported cases. Several of the new cases are connected to groups or families who have returned to Nova Scotia following travel outside of Canada. None of these cases are from spread within the community.

The 68 individuals affected range in age from under ten to mid-70's. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. One individual remains in hospital. Two individuals have recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and is working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

To date, Nova Scotia has 2,772 negative test results and 68 confirmed cases.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

 

March 24, 2020

Premier Stephen McNeil and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health, announced further measures today, March 24, to strengthen the health system and help Nova Scotians dealing with COVID-19.

“Keeping Nova Scotians safe and healthy is our number one job. Everything we are doing, we are doing to keep you safe,” said Premier McNeil. “We all need to keep working together, support one another and make sure we are following the public health advice. That is the only way we can control the spread of this virus.”

Measures announced today include:

  • increased testing for COVID-19 -- public health officials have begun testing all close contacts of positive cases
  • lab capacity is doubling to accommodate increased testing
  • expanding virtual care for physicians, nurse practitioners and others so they can offer appointments to patients through telephone or video, minimizing the need to leave the house; more than 80 providers have signed up for video so far
  • 811 has increased staff and technology and is now answering 50 per cent more calls; on April 3, 811 will again double its capacity
  • enhanced infection control measures at hospitals to protect health-care workers and the public include reassigning and adding new staff to increase the frequency of cleaning and disinfection; focusing on high-risk areas and high-traffic areas and high-touch surfaces; using stronger cleaning products
  • regulated health professions can only stay open for emergency or urgent cases or to provide virtual care (excluding doctors, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, nurses and paramedics) as long as they can meet social distancing requirements in their waiting room or other non-clinical areas and follow the cleaning protocol
  • non-regulated health professions (such as naturopaths) must close. One exception is podiatrists who must follow the directive related to regulated health professions
  • Access Centres and Registry of Motor Vehicle Offices will start to resume operations in a scaled back, limited contact business model. Staff working out of Access Centres and Registry of Motor Vehicle offices in Amherst, Bridgewater, Dartmouth, Kentville, Stellarton, Sydney and Yarmouth will be available to help people with urgent matters by calling 1-800-670-4357. In addition, government has extended deadlines for more vehicle permits, registrations and renewals until Aug.31. Drop-off boxes for applicable services will also be available at Access Centres in Amherst, Bridgewater, Dartmouth, Kentville, Stellarton, Sydney and Yarmouth. Many of the services are also available online.

Essential service sectors in Nova Scotia, which are exempt from the five-person-or-fewer gathering rules, have been clarified and are:

  • health
  • food, agri-food and fisheries
  • transportation, including trucking, rail and transit
  • construction and manufacturing
  • IT, telecommunications and critical infrastructure
  • public services, such as police, fire and ambulances

Individual business in these sectors must still maintain social distancing and other public health protocols.

“We need your help to prevent the spread of COVID-19,” said Dr. Strang. “It is critically important to wash your hands, practise social distancing and self-isolate if you need to. It’s also important to be truthful in your interactions with health-care workers and don’t call 911 unless you have an emergency. Working together we can protect our communities and our most vulnerable citizens.”

Ten new cases were identified Monday, March 23. The cases are travel-related or connected to earlier reported cases. Several of the new cases are connected to groups or families who have returned to Nova Scotia following travel outside of Canada. None of these cases are from spread within the community.

The 51 individuals affected range in age from under 10 to mid-70s. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. One individual remains in hospital. One individual has recovered and their case of COVID-19 is considered resolved.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and is working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

To date, Nova Scotia has 2,474 negative test results and 51 confirmed cases.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and remains in effect until noon, April 5
  • under the state of emergency government can control or prohibit assembly as well as travel to and from areas. It can also coordinate commerce activity and emergency responders
  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

 

March 24,2020

Sites designated for care of inpatient care of patients with COVID-19

NSHA is working to create provincial capacity for in-hospital care for COVID-19 patients who may require it. Our planning and response includes: Primary Assessment Centres for people referred by 811; Secondary Assessment Centres in regional hospitals for patients requiring some care & treatment, and COVID inpatient units for patients requiring admission. 
 
The following hospitals have been designated, and are prepared to host COVID-19 inpatients:
  • QEII-Halifax Infirmary site
  • Dartmouth General Hospital
  • Yarmouth Regional Hospital
  • Cape Breton Regional Hospital
  • St. Martha’s Regional Hospital
  • Colchester East Hants Health Centre
Units have been identified based on criteria such as access to negative pressure rooms, proximity to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), etc. Other COVID-19 units may be identified as the situation evolves.
 
Work will continue to make sure units are ready, and staff are appropriately trained and prepared to run the unit and safely care for patients. 

March 24, 2020

As of today, March 24, Nova Scotia has 51 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Ten new cases were identified Monday, March 23. The cases are travel-related or connected to earlier reported cases. Several of the new cases are connected to groups or families who have returned to Nova Scotia following travel outside of Canada. None of these cases are from spread within the community.

The 51 individuals affected range in age from under ten to mid-70's. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. One individual remains in the hospital. One individual has recovered and their case of COVID-19 is considered resolved.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and is working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

To date, Nova Scotia has 2,474 negative test results and 51 confirmed cases.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.


Important Changes to Canada's Postal Service

OTTAWA – Canada Post understands the important role the postal service plays and is committed to serving Canadians while taking action to keep our people and our communities safe. To do so effectively in these challenging times, we will continue to review and quickly adapt our approach with health and safety as our primary goal.  

Canada Post has initiated the following changes to our delivery operations and retail postal network:

Changes to our retail Post Office network

Hours of Service: In many post offices operated by Canada Post, we will reduce hours of service, opening one hour later and closing one hour earlier to clean, restock and provide some relief to employees. As well, for the first hour of each day, we will offer priority service to those whom are at a higher risk (the elderly or people with compromised immune systems). Franchise operated post offices will follow the measures put in place by franchise operators.  

We are working to keep our post offices open, but some may close due to building closures beyond our control and some smaller locations may close due to personnel reasons. In these cases, we will direct customers to the nearest operating post office. 

Social & Physical Distancing: We are asking waiting customers to please space themselves 2 metres (6 feet) apart. We are working on signage and floor decals for larger post offices. For smaller offices, we will look to limit the number of customers. We are also working on clear barriers for the counter to increase safety. 

Transactions: We will continue to accept cash, but are encouraging customers to pay by using the “tap” function on their debit or credit cards where possible.

Parcel pick-up: Parcels left at the post-office for pickup will not be returned-to-sender until further notice. We’ve suspended our normal 15-day hold period. We ask that customers who are feeling ill or self-isolating, to please delay their visit to the post office and to pick up their parcel when it’s safe to do so. Further changes to our parcel delivery process are below. 

Changes to how we deliver

Parcel Delivery:  To eliminate customer interactions at the door, reduce post office customer traffic and support social & physical distancing, we have implemented a Knock, Drop and Go approach. Delivery employees will knock or ring, choose the safest location available to leave the item and then depart for the next address. This change eliminates the need for signatures at the door and greatly reduces the number of parcels sent to our post offices for pick-up.

Items that require Proof of Age, ID or Customs payments will be sent directly from our depots to a retail post office for pick-up with no restrictions on when customers can pick up the item. Customers will receive a Delivery Notice Card in their mail letting them know which post office is holding their item for pickup. 

Service guarantees:  Our goal is to continue providing timely and reliable service. But to be safe, give our people time and manage potential challenges, we have suspended on On-time Delivery Guarantees for all parcel services, until further notice.  

Help with Social Distancing 

We please ask you to respect social and physical distancing with our employees who you may see out in the community. This will further support the social distancing initiatives we’ve implemented in our plants, depots and post offices. Like other organizations providing important services, our people are working hard under difficult circumstances.   

During delivery: Please give our employees space and avoid opening the door or greeting them personally when they are at the door to deliver, or filling a community mailbox. 

In post offices: When in a retail post office, please practise social distancing and the other measures that have been implemented.  

While we all support social and physical distancing efforts to keep our communities safe, social interaction from a distance is still very much appreciated by our people. A simple smile and wave through the window to your delivery agent, a supportive thumbs-up to the driver of the Canada Post truck as they go by or patience and a thank you to the person working at the post office all go a very long way these days.    

We thank Canadians for their patience and support during this period of significant change. We continue to follow the guidance of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) when it comes to creating new safety measures in our plants, depots, post offices as well as in our communities.

A Letter To Our Customers March 23 2020 Page 1

A Letter To Our Customers March 23 2020 Page 2

March 24, 2020

Nova Scotians are reminded that they should not call 911 if they are reporting someone who they believe is not self-isolating or social distancing during Covid-19 crisis.  

John Davison, Regional Emergency Management Organization Coordinator, said Pictou County residents have been calling 911 to report people who are not following the provincial government’s state of emergency laws put in place Sunday because of the coronavirus crisis,  but this is a misuse of the emergency service.

“911 is for reporting emergencies or life-threatening situations,” he said. “If you want to report someone for not following the rules of the state of emergency, you can do this by calling the police station directly.”

Law enforcement enforce orders under the Emergency Management Act and Health Protection Act. If you are aware of someone not following provincial direction, have a conversation with them first – they may need help. If a call to police is needed, please call a non-emergency number for the police that serve your community. Do not call 911.

Non-emergency police phone numbers
(All are 24 hour service)  
Pictou Detachment RCMP
(902) 485-4333
Stellarton Detachment RCMP
(902) 755-4141
New Glasgow Regional Police
(902) 752-1941
Westville Police
(902) 396-2777
Stellarton Police
(902) 752-6160

On March 22 , the Province of Nova Scotia declared a state of emergency to help contain the spread of COVID-19. The state of emergency will be in effect for 14 days and may be renewed. The emergency order is valid until noon on April 5, 2020.

Nova Scotians should not leave the province and only leave home for essential items and services. Under the state of emergency:

  • Nova Scotia borders will tighten to travellers and all entry points (land, sea, air) will be closely managed. Anyone entering the province will be stopped, questioned, and told to self-isolate for 14 days. Exemptions for cross-border travel include healthy workers in trades and transportations sectors who move goods and people (e.g. truck drivers); healthy people going to work (e.g. health-care workers); and people travelling into the province for essential health services (e.g. chemotherapy treatment).
  • Provincial parks, beaches, and tourist attractions are closed. Provincial trails will remain open for exercise. Gathering limits and social distancing guidelines must be followed.
  • Police are authorized to enforce orders under the Health Protection Act. If Nova Scotians and businesses do not practice social distancing and self-isolation, they will face fines of $1,000 for individuals and $7,500 for businesses. Multiple fines can be given each day an individual or business fails to comply. Police can also enforce offences under the Emergency Management Act. For example, fines for charging higher than fair market prices for goods and services.
  • There are several groups who are essential and exempt from gathering limits. They include but are not limited to grocery stores, gas stations, and pharmacies. If possible, one person per family should be designated to do these tasks. Other groups include construction sites, health-care services, community services (e.g. child protection) and criminal justice services, and law enforcement.

Nova Scotia Government:  https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/
Canadian Government: Canada.ca

REMO Police Lists ADMINPIO003

 

 

85x11 State+of+Emergency+AD ENG.pdf

March 23, 2020

Pictou Landing First Nation
Community Notice:

In response to the State of Emergency enforced by The Premier Stephen MacNeil, Pictou Landing First Nation Chief & Council had an emergency meeting today to address some concerns.

Community Curfew:

1. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak in NS, Canada and the Country, it has been decided to enforce a community curfew effective Monday March 23, 2020 beginning at 7:00pm. Curfew will be in effect from 7:00 pm – 7:00 am daily. There will be no activity in the community during this time. Community members are allowed to go for walks, but MUST be in their homes by 9:00 pm till 7:00 am.

2. Security will be stationed at checkpoints at both ends of the community with log books to note anyone who enters and leaves the community during the day. Security will patrol the community while working 24/7. People who live in the community can go out of the community from 7:00 am – 7:00 pm.

3. Only in the event of a medical emergency will you be able to leave your home after hours.

4. If you work outside the community and will be required to be outside the community during the community curfew hours, please contact Derek Francis 902.301.9758 so he can ensure your name is in the log books for the security staff.

5. Only essential workers, store deliveries, mail and Band staff who live outside of the community will be permitted from the outside to enter the community.

COVID Rules:

6. Self Isolation and Social Distancing of 6 feet is mandatory for all members of the community.

7. There are to be no community gatherings. This means no visiting, no dances, no parties, or any social events of any kind.

8. Community members who do no adhere to these rules will be escorted to their homes by the RCMP/ Security and can be fined under the Province of Nova Scotia $1000.00 per person, multiple times a day. This also includes driving around in groups in vehicles.

Health Update:

9. Should you require to go to town for necessities, it should be one member from your household.

10. If you require to go to town for a medical appointment, there should be 2 people maximum in the vehicle. PLEASE NOTE: Shoppers Drug Mart will deliver prescriptions, please call Michelle.

11. With the recent closure of the health centre, there is now a new mobile health line 902.301.6690 that community members can call for prescription refills, medical transportation, prescription pick-up and delivery, milk tokens, etc.

12. All Health Staff will be working from home, but community members can reach out directly to staff or call Michelle Denny during regular business hours (9am-4pm) at 902.301.6690.

13. Any emergency calls made to the new mobile health line after 4pm and on weekends will be forwarded to the Health Director.

14. Medical drivers will not be operating at this time, but PLFN will assist with gas expenses at the Victoria Corner Market for medical appointments. Call Michelle on the new mobile health line for prior approval.

15. For any home care inquiries, call Jyl Cress at 902.301.9965 or Kayla McCulloch at 902.301.9524.

16. There are also several Mental Health Clinicians and Counsellors (listed below) that are available to do counselling sessions over the phone or via video chat for community members, so please do not hesitate to reach out, as this is a stressful time.

Tiana Fusco: 902.754.4632
George Maringpasi: 902.237.4844
Theresa Fraser (Children & Youth): 902.301.9192
Emma Larson (Children & Youth): 902.759.8145
Michelle LeBrun: 782.440.2711

General Community Update:

17. Please keep all animals fenced, kennelled, or on a leash. Failure to do so will result in the SPCA being phoned.

18. PLFN playground is closed as well as the PLFN beach.

19. Brita’s are still being delivered.

Fisheries Update:

20. For any questions or emergencies relating to Fisheries you can reach out Marsha Mills at 902.921.8432.

VCM Update:

21. The store has new hours effective today. The store is open 9:00 am – 6:00 pm. 9:00 am – 10:00 am is for Elders only.

22. There is a limit on the number of customers in the store. It is a maximum of 5 people.

23. There is no longer self serve gas, all gas will be full serve.

24. Remember to WASH your hands often, we can all do our part and fight this together,

Sincerely, Chief & Council


 

Canadian farmers and food businesses work hard so Canadians have quality food on their grocery store shelves and kitchen tables. In these times of uncertainty, it is more important than ever to make sure that they are supported so they can continue providing the good, healthy food that nourishes our families.

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced important new measures to support farmers and agri-food businesses in Canada facing financial hardship due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Farm Credit Canada will receive support from the Government of Canada that will allow for an additional $5 billion in lending capacity to producers, agribusinesses, and food processors. This will offer increased flexibility to farmers who face cashflow issues and to processors who are impacted by lost sales, helping them remain financially strong during this difficult time.

In addition, all eligible farmers who have an outstanding Advance Payments Program (APP) loan due on or before April 30 will receive a Stay of Default, allowing them an additional six months to repay the loan. This important measure, which represents $173 million in deferred loans, will help keep more money in farmers’ pockets during these critical months.

The Stay of Default will also provide farmers the flexibility they need to manage their cashflow when facing lower prices or reduced marketing opportunities. Applicable farmers who still have interest-free loans outstanding will have the opportunity to apply for an additional $100,000 interest-free portion for 2020-2021, as long as their total APP advances remain under the $1 million cap.

The Government of Canada remains committed to supporting Canada’s agricultural sector to ensure that farmers and businesses have the support they need to provide for their families and all Canadians during this critical time.

Quotes

“Farmers and food producers work hard to put food on tables across our country, and they should not have to worry about being able to afford their loan payments or having enough money to support their own families. We are taking action now to give them more flexibility to meet the challenges ahead in these times of uncertainty.”

The Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

“Like many Canadians, I am truly grateful for our farmers and food business owners and employees, who continue working hard so we all have quality food on our grocery store shelves and kitchen tables. Their continued work is essential to our plan to manage COVID-19. The measures announced today will provide farmers and food producers across the country with important financial flexibility they will need during these challenging times.”

The Hon. Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food     

Quick Facts

  • Grains, oilseeds, and pulse producers who participated in the 2018 Stay of Default announced this summer, are encouraged to contact their administrator for more details. Cattle, bison, flower, and potted plant producers should also contact their APP administrator to enquire about their eligibility for the Stay of Default.
  • The Advance Payments Program is a financial loan guarantee program that provides producers easy access to credit through cash advances. For the 2019 program year, there are over 21,000 producers participating and over $3 billion in advances.
  • Administrators participating in the Stay of Default are the Alberta Sugar Beet Growers, Alberta Wheat Commission, BC Breeder and Feeder Association, Canadian Canola Growers Association, Manitoba Corn Growers Association Inc., Manitoba Livestock Cash Advance Inc., Western Cash Advance Program Inc., PEI Federation of Agriculture, and the Agricultural Credit Corporation.
  • Farm Credit Canada is our country’s leading agriculture and food lender, with a healthy loan portfolio of more than $38 billion. The Crown corporation provides flexible, competitively priced financing, management software, information, and knowledge specifically designed for the agriculture and food industries. 
  • Farmers will continue to have support under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership. The comprehensive suite of business risk management programs are designed to help manage significant financial impacts and risks beyond farmers’ control.
  • The new deadlines for outstanding Advance Payments Program loans are as follows:
    • September 30, 2020: 2018 cash advances for grains, oilseeds, and pulses.
    • September 30, 2020: 2018 cash advances for cattle and bison.
    • October 31, 2020: 2019 cash advances on flowers and potted plants.
March 23,2020
Do not call 911 to report individuals who are not self-isolating or social distancing. 911 is for emergency or life-threatening situations only. #COVID19NS. Here is a list of policing agencies in your area.

ETzeWlOWsAIElDi

March 23,2020

As of today, March 23, Nova Scotia has 41 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Thirteen new cases were identified Sunday, March 22. The cases are travel-related or related to earlier reported cases. Several of the new cases are connected and involve groups or families who have returned to Nova Scotia following travel outside of Canada.

The 41 individuals affected range in age from under ten to mid-70’s. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. One individual remains in hospital. At this point, there has been no spread within communities.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and are working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab is now certified to report positive and negative tests for COVID-19. Tests no longer have to be sent to the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg. To date, Nova Scotia has 2,308 negative test results and 41 confirmed cases.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. If you have travelled outside of Nova Scotia or been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today’s update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia's Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and remains in effect until noon, April 5
  • under the state of emergency government can control or prohibit assembly as well as travel to and from areas. It can also coordinate commerce activity and emergency responders

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

State of Emergency Declaration: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/Declaration-of-Provincial-State-of-Emergency-by-Minister-Porter-Signed-March-22-2020.pdf

March 22, 2020

Provincial State of Emergency

On March 22, the Province of Nova Scotia declared a state of emergency to help contain the spread of COVID-19. The state of emergency will be in effect for 14 days and may be renewed. The emergency order is valid until April 5, 2020.

Declaration of Provincial State of Emergency by Minister Porter Signed March 22 2021


Direction of the Minister under a Declared State of Emergency March 22 Signed

Nova Scotia Health Authority Closures: 
A reminder of the following closures by the Nova Scotia Health Authority in the Pictou, Antigonish and Colchester counties. THE FOLLOWING CLOSURES ARE IN EFFECT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE AS PART OF OUR RESPONSE TO COVID-19

All non-urgent diagnostic imaging appointments will be rescheduled and walk-in x-ray services will be closed.

Out-patient blood collection services will not close completely however, services will be reduced (i.e. reduction in hours and number of locations). You can find an up to date list of blood collection service disruptions here. Patients who currently have requisitions for routine bloodwork are advised to contact their ordering physician or nurse practitioner for direction regarding their laboratory testing.

All NSHA libraries are closed

ADHD Assessment Clinic held weekly at Colchester East Hants Health Centre in Truro is closed until further notice

All group-based programs at the One Door Chronic Disease Management Clinic in New Glasgow are cancelled until March 31, possibly longer.

All group-based programs at the Chronic Disease Management Clinic in at Colchester East Hants Health Centre in Truro are cancelled until March 31, possibly longer.

The Your Way 2 Wellness Program scheduled to begin in Elmsdale on April 1 has been postponed.

Martha’s Place Gift Shop at the Aberdeen Hospital in New Glasgow is closed until further notice.

The following Mental Health & Addictions Program services will pause until further notice:

All group-based programs, group therapies/ treatments, and community outreach visits

Non-urgent home visits

Adolescent Outreach Services and Schools Plus, offered in various schools across the province

New Hope Club in New Glasgow

Driving While Impaired and Smoking/Tobacco/Nicotine Cessation programming.

ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY CLOSURES

PLEASE NOTE AS WELL: Lillian Fraser Memorial Hospital emergency department in Tatamagouche will be closed from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

March 21, 2020

As of today, March 21, Nova Scotia has nine confirmed cases and 12 presumptive cases of COVID-19, for a total of 21.

Six new cases were identified Friday, March 20. All are travel-related. The original hospitalized case has been released and is recovering at home. One of the other confirmed cases is hospitalized.

The cases are located across the province. The 21 individuals affected range in age from late-teens to mid-70’s.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and are working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

“This is an unprecedented time for all of us and I want to thank Nova Scotians for their cooperation given the disruption to all of our daily lives,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “If we follow public health advice, support our neighbors, friends and family, and do our part, we will slow the spread of this virus in our province.”

The province is testing daily, working with partners at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg. To date, Nova Scotia has 1,826 negative test results, 12 presumptive positive cases and nine confirmed cases.

“This is just the beginning for Nova Scotia and we all need to stay vigilant, practise good hygiene and social distancing, and self-isolate for 14 days if you have travelled outside Canada or are feeling unwell,” said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health. “The prevention measures we’ve put in place can work and there is still time for our actions to influence the impact that COVID-19 has on Nova Scotia.”

As of today, dentists can no longer practice dentistry in their offices unless they deem it necessary to perform an emergency dental procedure in the best interest of the patient’s health. This is an order under the Health Protection Act.

In addition to prevention measures put in place by government and the chief medical officer of health, the Nova Scotia Health Authority and the IWK Health Centre have taken steps to ensure the health system is ready to respond to COVID-19, including:

  • making changes to non-essential services so staff are available to focus on COVID-19 and essential services, such as cancer care
  • providing options for virtual care and telehealth care so doctors and other health-care providers can reduce face-to-face visits but also help patients regardless of where they are
  • restricting visitors to protect the vulnerable patients in our hospitals
  • providing support to public health as they give advice on measures to slow down the spread of the virus
  • ensuring facilities are well-prepared to meet the health-care needs of Nova Scotians during a pandemic
  • opening new assessment centres to meet the need for assessments (there are now 14 centres around the province)

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada must self-isolate for 14 days when they return to Nova Scotia. If you have been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quotes:

Our teams are working very hard to maintain essential services and deliver safe and supportive care in a challenging environment. The difficult decisions that we’ve made to reduce services and limit access to our facilities will help ensure we can continue to provide the most urgently needed care and create capacity in the system for Nova Scotians needing care related to COVID-19, while protecting the health and wellness of our staff and physicians.Dr. Brendan Carrpresident and CEONova Scotia Health Authority

We had to reduce the number of people who enter the health centre, which was a difficult decision for us to make as we pride ourselves on being patient and family centred. This decision and others are important as we decrease foot traffic and support social distancing in facilities, like the IWK, to keep patients, their families and our staff safe.Dr. Krista Jangaardpresident and CEOIWK Health Centre

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Health Authority: http://www.nshealth.ca/coronavirus

IWK: http://www.iwk.nshealth.ca/COVID-19

March 21, 2020

Premier Stephen McNeil, Minister of Business Geoff MacLellan and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health, announced today, March 20, measures to help Nova Scotians and Nova Scotia businesses dealing with COVID-19.

Effective immediately, government will invest $161 million to address cash flow and access to credit for small and medium-sized businesses in Nova Scotia.

“I’ve put together a rapid response team to help us best understand the needs of small and medium-sized businesses and our first wave of supports is focused on those most immediately impacted,” said Mr. MacLellan. “We will take further steps as necessary.”

Government will defer payments until June 30 for:

  • all government loans, including those under the Farm Loan Board, Fisheries and Aquaculture Loan Board, Jobs Fund, Nova Scotia Business Fund, Municipal Finance Corp. and Housing Nova Scotia.
  • small business fees, including business renewal fees and workers compensation premiums (a list of fees will be posted online early next week)

Changes to the Small Business Loan Guarantee Program, administered through credit unions, include:

  • deferring principal and interest payments until June 30
  • enhancing the program to make it easier for businesses to access credit up to $500,000
  • those who might not qualify for a loan, government will guarantee the first $100,000

Further measures include:

  • small businesses which do business with the government will be paid within five days instead of the standard 30 days
  • suspending payments on Nova Scotia student loans for six months, from March 30 to Sept. 30 and students do not have to apply
  • ensuring more Nova Scotians can access the internet to work from home, by providing $15 million as an incentive to providers to speed up projects under the Internet for Nova Scotia Initiative and complete them as soon as possible

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada must self-isolate for 14 days when they return to Nova Scotia. If you have been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

 

March 21, 2020

The fishing and aquaculture industries are a vital part of the province’s economy and an important source of food.

Fisheries and Aquaculture Minister Keith Colwell is meeting regularly with the ministers responsible for fisheries and aquaculture in the other Atlantic provinces and Quebec to discuss ways to support the seafood industry during the COVID-19 crisis.

The province announced one measure in support of Nova Scotia’s fishery sector today, March 20, that it is deferring payments and interest for government lending programs until June 30. This includes loans under the Fisheries and Aquaculture Loan Board.

The five provincial ministers have begun weekly discussions to share ideas and discuss developments and options. Today, the ministers also had a joint call with federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Bernadette Jordan.

“Nova Scotia’s ongoing collaboration with Minister Jordan and the federal government, and our strong working relationship with the other Atlantic provinces and Quebec benefit the commercial fishery in our region. I look forward to our continued co-operation in the future as we gather information from our local industry and hear their concerns during this difficult time coping with COVID-19. By communicating and working closely together and with the federal department, we can better help our fishing industries meet today’s challenges, “said Mr. Colwell.

In their call this week, the ministers discussed the importance of the fishing and aquaculture sector to their individual provinces, the importance of food supply, and their desire to work together with their respective industries to minimize the impact of COVID-19 as much as possible, to ensure people remain safe. They agreed to work collectively with the federal government on ways to lessen impacts.

Quotes:

The public health measures put in place to combat the COVID-19 pandemic have created a unique situation with both economic and social consequences for our seafood industry and or coastal communities. Unique solutions will be required, but working together as a region provides an advantage for all of Atlantic Canada’s seafood producers. The health of our citizens is top priority but we are also committed to helping this vital industry remain strong.Prince Edward Island Minister of Fisheries and Communities Jamie Fox

It is imperative that we work together to support Atlantic Canada’s seafood industry in these difficult times. Our harvesters, aquaculture producers and seafood processors have always been ready to adapt to make sure they maintain their livelihood for current and future generations, and this is no exception. We will continue to focus efforts to support this resilient industry and to ensure it remains a sustainable way of life for rural, coastal and Aboriginal communities.New Brunswick Minister of AgricultureAquaculture and Fisheries Ross Wetmore

As the pandemic’s impact on the Atlantic region’s seafood sector evolves, I will continue to work in close collaboration with my Atlantic colleagues to secure the necessary strategies and supports that ensure our respective fishing industries correctly respond and ultimately recover.Newfoundland and Labrador Minister of Fisheries and Land Resources Gerry Byrne

Quick Facts:

  • total fish and seafood exports from Nova Scotia were $2.3 billion in 2019, a 13.6 per cent increase over 2018 export earnings
  • lobster led the way as Nova Scotia’s most valuable export species in 2019, valued at almost $1.2 billion
  • aquaculture delivers new, well-paying, year-round jobs centered in coastal and rural communities within Nova Scotia, where they are needed most
  • Nova Scotia’s aquaculture industry was worth more than $88 million and directly employed 519 people in full- and part-time positions in 2018. Additional Resources: Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture: https://novascotia.ca/fish

Nova Scotia’s International Seafood Brand: https://nsseafood.com

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Public Health offices: http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices

COVID-19 Media Line: 902-424-3310

 

March 21,2020

With the rapidly rising use of sanitizing and disposable wipes amid the COVID-19 crisis, Residents are reminded of the importance of NOT flushing wipes of any sort- including those labelled “Flushable” or “Biodegradable”. 

March 20, 2020

As of today, Nova Scotia has five confirmed cases and ten presumptive cases of COVID-19, for a total of 15.

One new case was identified Thursday, March 19. It is travel-related.

The cases are located across the province. The 15 individuals affected range in age from mid-20’s to mid-70’s.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and are working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

The province is testing daily, working with partners at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg. To date, Nova Scotia has 1,546 negative test results, ten presumptive positive cases and five confirmed cases.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada must self-isolate for 14 days when they return to Nova Scotia. If you have been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today’s update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Public Health offices:
http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices

 

Updated March 20,2020

little harbour

Local Fire Department offers a delivery service to those in need of goods

LITTLE HARBOUR, N.S. – A local fire department is serving its community in a new way during the COVID-19.

The Little Harbour Fire Department has posted on social media that it has volunteers ready to deliver food or medications to residents who are self-isolating or unable to leave their homes during the coronavirus crisis.

Greg Evans, Deputy Fire Chief for Little Harbour, said he came up with the idea after reaching out to another fire department member who recently returned from vacation and is self-isolating in their home.

“There is nothing wrong with him, but he can’t go anywhere, and neither can his wife and kids, so I made the offer to go shopping for him,” said Evans. “He has friends and family helping him out which is great but others in the community might not.”

Evans said he put the idea out to other members as well because he works during daytime hours so others who are working from home or shift work might be able to fill in when someone else isn’t available.

“I had about a dozen people from the fire department respond (to help out) and someone from the community. We haven’t had anyone use our service yet and we don’t expect a lot of takers because a lot of people probably have family and close friends to look after them, but if someone needs eggs or heart medication and their sister is going to get it tomorrow, but they need it today, they now have the option of calling us to pick it up.”

He said the details of how the delivery service will work haven’t been finalized, but he expects that when a call comes into him, he will put the message out to see if anyone is available to help. Once the item is purchased the arrangements can be made to get the goods and keep everyone safe.

Evans said this service is a way for the local fire department to continue serving its community in its time of need. The department has closed its hall for non-essential events and has postponed one of its largest fundraisers to keep the virus from spreading. Training nights have also been suspended for now and if the department is called out on a call, extra precautions will be taken to keep firefighters healthy.

“We are an essential service and emergency service and things have to be done and risks have to be taken, but we wear protective equipment such as gloves and bunker gear and have self-contained breathing apparatuses,” he said.
Cleaning procedures are already in place for the gear and vehicles and this will always be re-enforced.

“We are going to slow down a bit and make sure we are doubly protected,” he said.

Regarding medical assistance calls, protocols have been put in place that now has 911 screening calls to determine if only EHS should be present rather than calling out first responders.
He said mutual aid and automatic aid between fire departments is another useful tool that will be used to make sure no community goes without any emergency service.

Anyone wanting to take advantage of the Little Harbour Fire Department’s delivery service can contact Greg Evans at 902-759-0633.

Editors Note: If you have a good news story from your community, let us help share it. Send a note to sueann.musick@munpict.ca and I will be in touch.


 

Updated March 20,2020
Updated Hours 4


 

Updated March 19, 2020

Premier Stephen McNeil, Community Services Minister Kelly Regan and Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health, announced today, March 19, measures to help vulnerable Nova Scotians and to further prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the province.

Measures announced today to help vulnerable Nova Scotians include:

  • investing $2.2 million so that every individual and family member on income assistance will receive an additional $50 starting Friday, March 20, to help pay for food, cleaning supplies and personal care items. People do not need to apply.
  • $1 million to help Feed Nova Scotia purchase food and hire more staff
  • no tenant can be evicted because their income has been impacted by COVID-19, effective immediately for the next three months
  • emergency funding of $230,000 for Senior Safety Programs and Community Links to help vulnerable older adults
  • university students from Nova Scotia who are still living in residences need to go home, to provide space for social distancing for those students from outside the province who are not able to travel

As announced yesterday, personal service and fitness establishments such as hair salons, barber shops, spas, nail salons, body art establishments and gyms must shut down by midnight tonight

The Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) said today there was a case of low-risk public exposure to COVID-19 at two Halifax locations March 5 - 7. People who attended a high school basketball tournament at Halifax Grammar School gymnasium and the Homburg Athletic Centre gymnasium at Saint Mary’s University should closely monitor their health for COVID-19 symptoms. More information at http://www.nshealth.ca/news/nsha-advising-potential-covid-19-exposure-two-halifax-locations

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada must self-isolate for 14 days when they return to Nova Scotia. If you have been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

Nova Scotia Health Authority: https://www.nshealth.ca

IWK Health Centre: http://www.iwk.nshealth.ca/

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Public Health offices: http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices

As of today, March 19, Nova Scotia has five confirmed cases and nine presumptive cases of COVID-19, for a total of 14.


 

Two new cases were identified Wednesday, March 18. Both are travel-related.

The cases are located across the province. Northern Nova Scotia remains the only region without a positive case of COVID-19 at this time. The 14 individuals affected range in age from early 30’s to mid-70’s.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

The province is testing daily, working with our partners at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg. To date, Nova Scotia has 1,373 negative test results, nine presumptive positive cases and five confirmed cases.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada must self-isolate for 14 days when they return to Nova Scotia. If you have been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today’s update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Public Health offices:
http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices

 

Updated March 18, 2020:
A Message from Central Nova MP Sean Fraser who provides more information on federal programs to help ease the financial burden of residents and businesses while they deal with COVID-19. 

Canadians should not have to worry about the cost of basic necessities at a time when their primary focus should be on the health and well-being of their families and neighbours.

The potential economic consequences connected to COVID-19 are extraordinary and demand an extraordinary response.

I have been working around the clock with the Minister of Finance and his team over the past few days to help design new measures we can advance to help protect the finances of Canadians and provide assistance to Canadian businesses that will help the Canadian economy withstand any increased pressures.

The measures announced in today’s package represent the first phase of our economic response and includes up to $27 Billion in direct support for Canadians, to establish the following measures:

➡️The Emergency Care Benefit – this benefit will support Canadians who become sick, need to self-isolate, or need to take time away from work to care for a child. This benefit will provide direct assistance to Canadians who do not qualify for Employment Insurance (EI) of up to $450 per week for up to 15 weeks. This benefit will be available in early April and you will be able to apply online from your home in order to follow public health advice. We will not require a doctor’s note, which would only further add to the burden facing our public health care system.

➡️The Emergency Support Benefit – this benefit will provide direct financial support to Canadians that are laid off or experience a decline in hours. Importantly, this new benefit will provide coverage for individuals that are self-employed or that do not otherwise qualify for Employment Insurance.

➡️An enhanced GST Credit – this measure will support Canadians that have modest incomes by doubling the maximum credit for over 12 Million families. This credit top-up would mean an average of $400 for single adults, and $600 for couples. This measure will inject $5.5 Billion into the Canadian economy and will be available as soon as May 2020.

➡️An enhanced Canada Child Benefit that will see an additional $300 per child for the 2019-2020 year to assist with unexpected challenges tied to raising children, including disruptions to child care.

➡️A new Wage Subsidy for Small and Medium sized businesses. This will equate to 10% of their employees’ salary for a period of 3 months and will be delivered by granting a holiday on a portion of tax withholding remittances that would ordinarily be due to the federal government. It will give up to $1,375 per employee and up to $25,000 per employer. This measure will apply not only to businesses, but also to non-profits and will help them avoid layoffs.

➡️A 6 month moratorium on all Canada Student Loans payments – during the period of this deferral, no student loan payments will become due, and no interest will be charged on amounts owed during this time. This relief will save 1 Million young Canadians an average of $160 per month.

➡️Additional support to assist Canadians without access to housing. For many of these individuals, self-isolation is an impossibility and we need to ensure they have the support to protect their health. This will include funding to help shelters implement public health measures to ensure vulnerable individuals, including women and children fleeing violence, will have a safe place to seek refuge.

➡️Changes to help protect the retirement savings of Canadian seniors in light of market volatility, we are reducing the mandatory withdrawal from RRIFs by 25%.

➡️A new $305 Million Indigenous Community Support Fund to help First Nations, Inuit, and Metis communities that will help provide them address immediate needs that many Canadians take for granted.

We have been working with Canada’s major banks, who have determined they will work with Canadians on a case-by-case basis to provide support for those who have experienced disruptions to their pay, interruptions to child care, or unexpected health needs. This will begin with a deferral of mortgage payments for affected Canadians by up to 6 months.

In addition, we have advanced $55 Billion in immediate support for Canadian businesses and worked with other organizations or agencies to help protect against potential negative economic consequences of the spread of COVID-19, including:

An extension of the tax filing deadline to June 1. This tax deferral will allow businesses that owe taxes at the end of the year to delay the time at which taxes would ordinarily become due until August 31. No interest will accrue during this period.

Support of more than $10 Billion in loans for businesses of all sizes through the Business Credit Availability Program.

Increased Liquidity for lenders in the Canadian economy to help businesses stay afloat through $50 Billion in mortgage purchases that will allow banks to free up additional lending capacity.

A reduction of the interest rate through the Bank of Canada to 0.75%. Additionally, the Bank of Canada will free up lending capacity by approximately $50 Billion.

Doubling the lending capacity of Farm Credit Canada.

The Superintendent of Financial Institutions has changed the rules regulating Canada’s major banks that will allow them to increase lending capacity by approximately $300 Billion.

Additional support through EDC’s Canada Account for items that are in Canada’s national interest.

To the extent we need to take further action in the coming days, weeks, or months, we will. We will be there for Canadian families and businesses in their time of need and we will get through this together.

Take care of yourselves, and take care of each other.

For more information and how to access these supports visit: www.canada.ca/economic-response-plan


 

Updated March 18, 2020
Our Building Inspections Department is continuing to provide this service to County residents and businesses. However, since precautions are being taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19,  our staff has put new procedures in place to protect themselves and residents. 

Building Inspection Protocol Page 2


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Updated March 18,2020

As of today, Nova Scotia has three confirmed cases and nine presumptive cases of COVID-19.

Five new cases were identified Tuesday, March 17. Four of the cases are travel-related and one is connected to an earlier case.

The 12 individuals affected range in age from early 30’s to mid-70’s. They are all in self-isolation and recovering at home.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days. They are located across the province. Northern Nova Scotia is the only region without a positive case of COVID-19 at this time.

The province is testing daily, working with our partners at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg. To date, Nova Scotia has 1,141 negative test results, nine presumptive positive cases and three confirmed cases.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada must self-isolate for 14 days when they return to Nova Scotia. If you have been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough you should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today’s update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • the Government of Canada has issued a travel advisory asking Canadians to avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Public Health offices:
http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices

Updated March 17,2020

Nova Scotians are being asked to take every precaution including social distancing to prevent the spread of COVID-19. That is why Access Nova Scotia and Registry of Motor Vehicle Offices are temporarily closing for one week starting Wednesday, March 18, to establish new ways of providing service to minimize contact between people. Offices are expected to reopen Wednesday, March 25.

Government is also extending the date for driver licences and vehicle registrations expiring in March, April and May to Aug. 31. All law enforcement agencies have been notified of the extensions. Some of the services offered through Access Nova Scotia and Registry of Motor Vehicle Offices are available online at https://www.novascotia.ca/sns/access/online-services.asp

Quick Facts:

  • there are 20 Access Centres/Registry of Motor Vehicles Offices in Nova Scotia
  • about 10,000 driver licences are renewed monthly
  • between 20,000-25,000 vehicle registrations are renewed monthly
  • Nova Scotians can call the provincial contact centre with urgent enquiries at 1-800-670-4357.

Notices and closures

The following restrictions are in place under the Authority of the Health Protection Act:

  • Long-term care facilities are closed to all visitors.
  • Public schools will be closed for two weeks following March Break (weeks of March 23 and March 30).
  • All licensed childcare providers are required to close starting March 17 through April 3.
  • March Break camps are cancelled.
  • Casinos in Halifax and Sydney will close as of 12 a.m. on March 16 and bar owners can no longer operate VLTs.

Organizations and businesses are required to practise social distancing of two metres (6 feet) and keep gatherings below 150 or much smaller, if possible. This applies to restaurants, bars, movie theatres, and other gathering spots.

There are to be no more gatherings of more than 50 people.

As of Thursday, 19 March:

  • restaurants are restricted to take-out and delivery orders only. They can’t open for in-person dining.
  • all drinking establishments, winery and distillery tasting rooms and craft taprooms must close.

Private liquor stores still operate. Craft breweries, wineries and distilleries can still sell their products from their storefronts.

Nova Scotia Health Authority and IWK Health Centre

Nova Scotia Health Authority is suspending some elective and non-urgent appointments and services to contain the spread of COVID-19 and conserve resources. Read more on the NSHA website.

IWK Health Centre is suspending all non-urgent appointments and services. Urgent and emergency appointments and services are continuing. Read more on the IWK website.

Nova Scotia Health Authority and the IWK Health Centre are limiting visitors to prevent the spread of any respiratory illness, including COVID-19.

Government office and facility closures

Check the closures page for up-to-date provincial government office and facility closures.

Updated March 17, 2020

Many Nova Scotia Health Authority services are being reduced or suspended until further notice as part of the effort to contain the spread of COVID-19 as well as to conserve and redeploy our resources in anticipation of increasing demand related to the pandemic.

This means that beginning Wednesday, March 18:

· All elective outpatient visits are cancelled. Individual services will contact patients whose appointments are proceeding. Dialysis, chemotherapy and radiation treatments, and mental health and addictions appointments will continue.
· All non-urgent diagnostic imaging appointments will be rescheduled and walk-in x-ray services will be closed. Cancer Care imaging, PET scans and other time-sensitive exams will continue.
· Outpatient blood collection services will not close completely but services will be reduced (i.e. reduction in hours and number of locations). Details regarding these changes will be communicated as soon as they are available.
· All same-day admission and elective surgical procedures are postponed. Cancer and urgent/emergency procedures will continue.
· As currently-occupied inpatient beds become available, they will be held open to create the capacity to establish COVID units in designated hospitals.

This reduction of services is a planned component of our pandemic response and business continuity planning.

As much as possible, NSHA is contacting scheduled patients and clients directly to notify them of cancellations.

A number of NSHA facilities had already reduced surgical schedules for a routine slowdown coinciding with March break. This has helped to minimize the impact of the change at this time, although some surgeries have already been impacted.

Information on changes to these and other service interruptions is being compiled and posted on the NSHA website as it is confirmed - http://www.nshealth.ca/temporaryclosures

This page will be updated regularly and will be Nova Scotians’ best source of information.
“While a reduction of services is a difficult decision and will, unfortunately, mean a delay of care to some Nova Scotians who need it, we have reached the phase of our planned pandemic response where this is necessary,” said Dr. Brendan Carr, president and CEO, NSHA. “These changes allow our system to be ready to care for others who experience the most serious effects of COVID-19, and to protect our staff and patients from exposure as much as possible.”

NSHA’s COVID-19 incident management team has been meeting since January to prepare our organizational response to the new virus circulating around the world, focused on ensuring supplies and processes were in place and additional services such as assessment centres could be activated quickly when required.

Patients with additional questions about service changes and reductions should contact their health care team or clinic. Our teams are experiencing high call volumes and will do their very best to answer your call in a timely manner. We thank you for your patience at this challenging time.

For more information and updates about NSHA’s response to COVID-19 please visit http://www.nshealth.ca/coronavirus.


Updated March 17, 2020

CLOSED TO WALK-IN TRAFFIC

During these unprecedented times, the Municipality is closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation and taking precautionary measures to protect our employees, our customers and our community.

In response to the COVID-19 issue, we have made the difficult decision to close our administrative offices to walk-in traffic effective immediately, and until further notice.  This is one way that we can do our part to promote social distancing and flatten the curve in the spread of Coronavirus.

Please be assured that our staff is available to assist you via phone by calling 902-485-4311.  As we anticipate higher than normal call volumes, we ask for your patience as we do our best to respond to your questions and voicemails.  Payment of tax and water accounts will continue to be accepted through online banking through your financial institution, or by cheque/money order sent to PO Box 910, Pictou, NS, B0K 1H0.

Inquiries may be directed to:

Tax Inquiries:                tax@munpict.ca

Water Inquiries: water@munpict.ca

General Inquiries:        carolyn.macintosh@munpict.ca

It is recommended that you monitor our website and Facebook pages for updates on operations.

ON-SITE DELIVERIES:  Please call 902-485-4311 for access to deliver goods.

MOPC Suspends All Public Meetings 

Council will continue to meet in the future electronically rather than in person and meeting rooms in the municipality’s administration building will no longer be available to the public for meeting space.


 Updated March 17, 2020:

Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health has announced two new presumptive cases of COVID-19, bringing the total number of positives in the province to seven.

As of today, March 17, Nova Scotia has 934 negative test results, six presumptive positive cases and one confirmed case

The two new presumptive cases are travel-related and connected to earlier cases. One of the initial three presumptive positive cases have now been confirmed by the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

The affected individuals are in self-isolation and recovering at home.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada or has been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • the Government of Canada has issued a travel advisory asking Canadians to avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397


 

 

Updated March 16, 2020

Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health has announced two new presumptive cases of COVID-19 bringing the total number of presumptive positives in the province to five.

The two cases are in Halifax Regional Municipality and are related. The case details include:

  • a male and female, both in their 50’s, were in close contact with individuals who had recently travelled outside the country
  • two other individuals in the household are now in self-isolation and being tested

The affected individuals are in self-isolation and recovering at home.

Public health has been in contact with these individuals and working to identify others who may have come in close contact with them. Those individuals are also being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada or has been in close contact with someone who has travelled and are experiencing fever (above 38 C) and/or new cough should complete the online questionnaire before calling 811. The online questionnaire can be found at: https://811.novascotia.ca/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • as of March 16, Nova Scotia has completed 676 tests for COVID-19, with 671 negative results and five presumptive positive cases. Testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
  • the Government of Canada has issued a travel advisory asking Canadians to avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Public Health offices:
http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices

Updated March 16, 2020

The Nova Scotia Securities Commission is alerting investors to be wary of people taking advantage of COVID-19 and economic turmoil to engage in investment scams.

A Nova Scotia investor contacted the commission after receiving a call from someone saying they were with National Bank. They were told that their investment plan was collapsing and they needed to immediately put money into their account to save it. The caller was using fear around the current economic conditions to attempt to steal the investor’s money.

Anyone who believes they have been contacted by someone engaging in investment fraud or fraudulent activities is advised to contact the commission at https://nssc.novascotia.ca/recognize-and-report-scam or by email at  .

Quotes:

Unfortunately, in times of economic turmoil many fraudsters try to take advantage of investors’ fears to steal their money. If you are contacted by anyone with warnings about your investments or finances, never give out any information and contact your adviser, bank, or investment firm to ensure the caller is legitimate.Stephanie Atkinsonacting director of EnforcementNova Scotia Securities Commission

Quick Facts:

-- March is Fraud Prevention Month in Canada. Throughout the month the commission will be sharing information and tips to help Nova Scotia investors recognize and avoid investment fraud. Visit the commission’s website at nssc.novascotia.ca to find investor education resources and videos.

Additional Resources:

File a complaint or report a scam to the Nova Scotia Securities Commission: https://nssc.novascotia.ca/recognize-and-report-scam

Follow the commission on Twitter at @NSSCommission to keep updated on new investment scams and investor education initiatives.

 

Updated March 16, 2020
meeting notice3


Updated March 15, 2020:  In the interest of the health and safety of inmates, their families, Correctional Services staff and the public, Nova Scotia’s correctional facilities will be closed to all visitors until further notice, effective immediately.

Lawyers who need to speak with their clients, who are in custody in correctional facilities, should contact the facility after noon on Monday, March 16, to arrange alternative methods of communication.

During this time, inmates will be able to make extra phone calls.

These public health safety measures apply to the Nova Scotia Youth Centre in Waterville, and the province’s four adult correctional facilities: the Cape Breton Correctional Facility in Sydney; the Central Nova Correctional Facility in Dartmouth; the Northeast Nova Scotia Correctional Facility in Priestville, Pictou Co. and the Southwest Nova Scotia Correctional Facility in Yarmouth.

These safety measures are being made with the guidance of public health officials and will be reassessed on a daily basis. Nova Scotia Correctional Services works closely with public health officials to ensure plans are in place at all times to mitigate the spread of any contagious virus or disease in the province’s correctional facilities.

Additional Resources:

Provincial Government Public Health Website: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus


 

Updated March 13, 2020

Public sector employees who travel outside of Canada, including the United States, will be required to self-isolate upon their return. The government introduced the travel protocols today, March 13, to reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in the province.

To date, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia.

Health-care workers, teachers, civil servants and other public sector employees who travel anywhere outside Canada will have to stay at home/self-isolate away from the public for 14 days after returning to the country. These measures also apply to students of Nova Scotia public schools and children in regulated child care centres who have travelled with their families, even if their parents or caregivers are not public sector employees.

“While we are fortunate to have no cases of COVID-19 in the province, we expect to see cases here very soon,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “We all need to do our part to reduce the spread, protect our most vulnerable and keep Nova Scotians healthy and safe.”

The private sector is encouraged to take the same approach and support employees to self-isolate for 14 days after travelling outside Canada.

The chief medical officer of health is also encouraging individuals, employers and community organizations to limit social gatherings to no more than 150 people to limit spread. This could include events like weddings, church services, movie theatres and concerts. This measure will help protect vulnerable Nova Scotians who are at greatest risk and will be reassessed as the situation evolves.

The province is also working with the federal government to delay the start of the cruise ship season.

Nova Scotians should think about additional measures they can take to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, such as:

  • avoiding close contact with others (keeping at least two metres or roughly six feet apart)
  • avoiding crowds and gatherings like parties and other group activities
  • staying home if ill, especially if you have a fever and or a new cough

Nova Scotians can find the most accurate, up-to-date information, including what to do if you are feeling unwell, at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/

Quick Facts:

  • Nova Scotia has no confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of March 13 with 226 negative tests completed
  • travel advice from the Public Health Agency of Canada says anyone who travels to Hubei province in China, Iran or Italy must self-isolate for 14 days upon return to Canada
  • Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act gives the chief medical officer of health the authority to give advice to protect public health and decrease risk to public health presented by communicable diseases such as COVID-19
  • the EMO Provincial Coordination Centre is activating at the monitoring level to help track the situation locally and globally and provide planning support and information to municipal partners and others
  • the 811 system is screening for COVID-19; there is also a self-assessment tool available on the 811 website

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line: 1-833-784-4397

Nova Scotia Public Health offices: http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices

811 Website: https://811.novascotia.ca/


 

New national screening protocols have been established as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to expand globally.

Anyone who has travelled outside Canada may have come in contact with the novel coronavirus and should closely monitor their health for 14 days after returning to the country. Travellers who start to feel unwell, should stay at home/self-isolate away from the public. Individuals who develop a fever, with a temperature 38°C or higher, and/or cough should call 811 for assessment.

To date, there have been no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia.

To help protect older Nova Scotians and those most at risk for severe illness, the province is restricting visitors who have travelled outside the country in the last 14 days from entering long-term care homes. As always, anyone who is feeling unwell should not enter a facility.

“We are expanding our screening to include travel outside of the country as the virus continues to spread,” said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health. “With more cases expected in Canada and spread into the community likely, we are adapting our processes to respond to this rapidly evolving situation.”

To prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including COVID-19, it is important that all Nova Scotians:

  • practise good handwashing hygiene
  • use cough and sneeze etiquette
  • avoid touching your face
  • minimize close face-to-face contact with people who appear ill
  • stay away from others if you feel unwell
  • regularly clean and disinfect high touch surfaces

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information at: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Quick Facts:

  • in December 2019, cases of pneumonia were reported in Wuhan, China, caused by a new virus that had not been seen in humans. The illness was caused by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and is called COVID-19
  • as of March 8, 2020, 62 cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in Canada and the virus continues to expand globally
  • Nova Scotia launched a website dedicated to the latest information about the coronavirus in January
  • the Government of Canada has set up a novel coronavirus information line at 1-833-784-4397

Additional Resources:

The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains a list of affected areas: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/covid-19-affected-areas-list.html

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Nova Scotia Public Health offices: http://www.nshealth.ca/public-health-offices


 

Updated March 11, 2020
patient restrictions

COVID-19 Assessment Centres

Last updated: March 10, 2020

Public health officials are working closely with colleagues across the country, and partners here in Nova Scotia, to prepare and respond to the increased likelihood of more COVID-19 infections in Canada. In December 2019, cases of pneumonia were reported in Wuhan, China caused by a new virus that hadn’t been seen in humans. The illness is known as “COVID-19”. The first cases in Canada were reported in late-January 2020. As the virus continues to spread globally, there is an increased likelihood we will see cases in Nova Scotia.

There have been no confirmed cases of the virus in Nova Scotia at this time. The public will be informed if a case is confirmed.

Anyone who has travelled outside Canada may have come in contact with the novel coronavirus and should closely monitor their health for 14 days after returning to the country.

Travellers who start to feel unwell, should stay at home/self-isolate away from the public.

Nova Scotians who have travelled out of country and who develop a fever with a temperature of 38°C or higher, and/or cough, should call 811.

811 will provide direction on what to do next. If there is a need for in-person assessment, 811 will refer to a COVID-19 assessment centre.

Please do not go to a COVID-19 assessment centre without having been referred by 811. We are working to be able to book specific appointment times in the coming days.

Those directed to an assessment centre by 811 will then have a physical assessment on site and based on that a swab will be taken for patients for whom it is appropriate.

For updated information on Coronavirus visit www.novascotia.ca/coronavirus and www.canada.ca/coronavirus


Health Canada has a webpage dedicated to updates and information about the coronovirus.  Click here for the latest news from health officials. https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html


On behalf of the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness, we wanted to pass along some new COVID-19 related resources that have started to be shared with the public.

As always, the Government website – https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus – is where people can find the most up-to-date information. The website had a significant update today and will continue to be updated as more information is available.

Dr. Strang and colleagues from NSHA and IWK provided an update about COVID-19 preparedness. This press conference can be watched at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGfSPVf_G3U.

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Q. What is being done with my paper to ensure it is protected from the COVID-19 virus? 

  1. The safety and health of our subscribers and staff is of the utmost importance. We have taken the following steps to handle our products: 
    1. Distributors and carriers of our newspapers and flyers have been asked to use gloves when handling our products where available, and to wash hands and apply sanitizers more frequently throughout their shifts. 
    2. Carriers who collect cash at the door are being asked to have money placed directly into an envelope or bag rather than in-hand to reduce the amount of contact with others. 
    3. All distributors and carriers have been instructed to reduce contact and to stay 3-6 feet away from others where possible. 
    4. Luckily, with the printing and delivery processes, the papers and flyers have a low-level of touch as production is automated and bundles are strapped and have exterior wrapping. 

 

Q. Can I request a plastic bag to be used or not used? 

  1. Yes – we will do our best to accommodate requests for your delivery to be contained in plastic or without plastic. Call your local publication to submit this request. 

 

Q. I don’t want to receive a physical paper during this time. 

  1. We understand that receiving external goods during this time is stressful for some. We also understand that during this time our members want to be connected to the latest news and developments about COVID-19. If even with our cleanliness measures in place you still feel you’d like to suspend your print delivery, we have options for you: 
    1. Continue your access with a digital membership. Our digital package includes a print replica online that looks exactly like the printed edition, available on desktop, iOS and Android devices. You’ll have unlimited access to all content within the paper (with archives to older editions) as well as on our website for all SaltWire Network publications. This access is also included with all print memberships. Contact your local publication to update your membership and get your username and password for access. 
    2. Contact your local publication to put your account on hold. Please consider continuing to support your local publication with a donation to our Newspapers in Education program where we provide access to the newspapers across Canada’s East Coast to students and teachers for learning purposes. 

 

Q. I am a newspaper or flyer carrier – I'm concerned about delivering products. 

  1. We understand this is a stressful time for many. We ensure that the papers and flyers received have been treated with the same reduced contact and rigorous cleanliness rules set out by the company before arriving to you. Luckily, with most of the printing and delivery processes, the papers and flyers have a low-level of touch as production is automated and bundles are strapped and have exterior wrapping.  

When it comes to delivering a product, you can take the following measures: 

    1. Where possible, your distributor will supply you with gloves to use on your route. If you have the ability to do so, you can also purchase gloves locally if available. 
    2. Practice staying 3-6 feet away from others as you deliver.  
    3. Practice not touching your face during your route. 
    4. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when returning from your route. 
    5. If you are a carrier who collects money, ask your subscribers to place collected money directly into envelope or bag rather than into your hand. Keep all money collected in an envelope or bag until returned to the office.  
    6. If still not comfortable delivering the product, please contact your manager to work out next steps. 

 

Here is the number:

 

CH - 1-902-426-3031

 

July 10 No New Cases and State of Emergency Extended

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As of today, July 10, Nova Scotia has three active cases of COVID-19. No new cases were identified on Thursday, July 9.

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